Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 102, Issue 1–3, pp 39–49 | Cite as

Effects of zinc, copper, and selenium on placental cadmium transport

  • Yali Zhang
  • Yongcheng Zhao
  • Jixian Wang
  • Hongda Zhu
  • Quingfen Liu
  • Yaguang Fan
  • Naifen Wang
  • Aiping Liu
  • Husheng Liu
  • Li Ou-Yang
  • Jinhui Zhao
  • Tiqiang Fan
Original Articles

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential effects of zinc, copper, and selenium on placental cadmium transport. From November 2002 through January 2003, a total of 47 healthy pregnant women from Da-Ye City, Hubei Province in central China participated in the study. Their age, parity, gestational age, pregnancy history, and lifestyle data were obtained by questionnaire interview. The placental, whole-blood, and cord blood levels of cadmium were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), whole-blood zinc was measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F-AAS), whole-blood copper by ICP-MS, and selenium was by atomic fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS). The cord blood cadmium concentration (0.020–1.48 μg/L) was significantly lower than in maternal blood (0.80–25.20 μg/L, p<0.01). The placental cadmium concentration was from 0.082 to 3.97 μg/g dry weight. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that lower levels of maternal blood copper were significantly associated with higher cadmium concentrations in cord blood. Placental cadmium in women with lower levels of maternal blood zinc was significantly higher than in those with normal zinc levels. The placental cadmium level in women with lower whole-blood selenium was significantly lower than in subjects with normal selenium levels. It was concluded that the essential elements copper, selenium, and zinc might significantly affect placental cadmium transport.

Index Entries

Zinc copper selenium cadmium placental transport 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yali Zhang
    • 1
  • Yongcheng Zhao
    • 1
  • Jixian Wang
    • 1
  • Hongda Zhu
    • 1
  • Quingfen Liu
    • 1
  • Yaguang Fan
    • 1
  • Naifen Wang
    • 2
  • Aiping Liu
    • 3
  • Husheng Liu
    • 2
  • Li Ou-Yang
    • 2
  • Jinhui Zhao
    • 3
  • Tiqiang Fan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology, Institute of Radiation MedicineChinese Academy of Medical SciencesTianjinPeople's Republic of China
  2. 2.Center Laboratory of School of Public HealthBeijing UniversityPekingPeople's Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of Environmental Health, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science & TechnologyWuhanPeople's Republic of China

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