Advertisement

Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

, Volume 80, Issue 3, pp 193–203 | Cite as

Rapid and high-frequency in vitro plant regeneration from leaflet and petiole explants of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

  • P. Venkatachalam
  • N. Geetha
  • K. Sankara Rao
  • N. Jayabalan
Article

Abstract

An efficient protocol for regeneration of groundnut plantlets from immature and mature leaflet and petiole explants excised from axenic seedlings has been developed. The highest frequency of callus induction obtained from leaflet explants was on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 2.0 mg/L of α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg/L of kinetin combination. MS medium containing different auxins in combination with 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) induced shoot buds. A BAP (2.0 mg/L) and NAA (0.5mg/L) combination resulted in the highest frequency of shoot-bud regeneration. Subsequent shoot multiplication was obtained on MS medium supplemented with either BAP or kinetin (5.0 mg/L) in combination with NAA (1.0 mg/L). Immature leaflet explants were found to be more responsive to shoot induction than mature leaflet explants. Direct shoot-bud regeneration was also observed from petiole explants on the same regeneration medium used for leaflet callus. Regenerated shoots were rooted on MS medium containing indole-3-butyric acid (2.0 mg/L) and kinetin (0.5 mg/L). Plantlets obtained were successfully established in the field, where they grew to maturity and set viable seeds.

Index Entries

Arachis hypogaea organogenesis shoot regeneration 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Heatley, M. E. and Smith, R. H. (1996), In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol. 32P, 115–118.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ponsamuel, J., Huhman, D. V., Cassidy, B. G., and Post-Beittenmiller, D. (1998), Plant Cell Rep. 17, 373–378.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Narasimhulu, S. B. and Reddy, G. M. (1983), Plant Sci. Lett. 31, 147–153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    McKently, A. H., Moore, G. A., and Gardner, F. P. (1990), Crop Sci. 30, 192–196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cheng, M., His, D. C. H., and Phillips, G. C. (1992), Peanut Sci. 19, 82–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Eapen, S. and George, L. (1993), Plant Cell Tissue Organ Cult. 35, 223–227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Venkatachalam, P., Subramaniampillai, A., and Jayabalan, N. (1996), Breed. Sci. 46, 315–320.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Li, Z., Jarret, R. L., Pittman, R. N., and Demski, J. W. (1994), In Vitro Cell. Dev. Biol. 30P, 187–191.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kanyand, M., Peterson, C. M., and Prakash, C. S. (1997), Plant Sci. 126, 87–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hazra, R. B., Sathaye, S. S., and Mascarenhas, A. F. (1989), Bio/Technology 7, 949–951.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Baker, C. M and Wetzstein, H. Y. (1992), Plant Cell Rep. 11, 71–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Baker, C. M. and Wetzstein, H. Y. (1995), Plant Cell Tissue Organ Cult. 40, 249–254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Ozias-Akins, P., Anderson, W. F., and Holbrook, C. C. (1992), Plant Sci. 83, 103–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Chengalrayan, K., Sathaye, S. S., and Hazra, S. (1994), Plant Cell Rep. 13, 578–581.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Chengalrayan, K., Mhaske, V. B., and Hazra, S. (1997), Plant Cell Rep. 16, 783–786.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Cheng, M., Jarret, R. L., Li, Z., Xing, A., and Demski, J. W. (1996), Plant Cell Rep. 15, 653–657.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Venkatachalam, P., Pillai, A. S., and Jayabalan, N. (1994), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 64, 99–103.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Murashige, T. and Skoog, F. (1962), Physiol. Plant. 15, 473–497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Gamborg, O. L., Miller, R. A., and Ojima, K. (1968), Exp. Cell Res. 50, 151–158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Bajaj, Y. P. S., Kumar, P., Labana, K. S., and Singh, M. M. (1981), Indian J. Exp. Bot. 19, 1026–1029.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Cheng, T. Y., Saka, H., and Vogui Dinh, T. H. (1980), Plant Sci. Lett. 19, 91–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Gill, R., Eapen, S., and Rao, P. S. (1987), J. Plant Physiol. 139, 1–5.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Gulati, A. and Jaiwal, P. K. (1994), Plant Cell Rep. 13, 523–527.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Sankara Rao, K. (1986), Plant Cell Rep. 3, 199–201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Mroginski, L. A., Kartha, K. K., and Shyluk, J. P. (1981), Can. J. Bot. 59, 826–830.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Pittman, R. N., Banks, D. J., Kirby, J. S., Mitchell, E. D., and Richardon, P. E. (1983), Peanut Sci. 10, 21–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Moss, J. P., Dutt, N. R. G., and Lingamaneeni, A. (1988), Int. Arachis News Lett. 4, 25–26.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Seitz, M. H., Stalker, H. T., and Green, C. C. (1987), Plant Breed. 98, 104–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    McKently, A. H., Moore, G. A., and Gardner, F. P. (1991), Crop Sci. 31, 833–837.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Venkatachalam
    • 1
  • N. Geetha
    • 1
  • K. Sankara Rao
    • 2
  • N. Jayabalan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant Science, School of Life SciencesBharathidasan UniversityTiruchirappalliIndia
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryIndian Institute of ScienceBangaloreIndia

Personalised recommendations