Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

, Volume 113, Issue 1–3, pp 13–26 | Cite as

Methodology for estimating removable quantities of agricultural residues for bioenergy and bioproduct use

  • Richard G. Nelson
  • Marie Walsh
  • John J. Sheehan
  • Robin Graham
Article

Abstract

A methodology was developed to estimate quantities of crop residues that can be removed while maintaining rain or wind erosion at less than or equal to the tolerable soil-loss level. Six corn and wheat rotations in the 10 largest corn-producing states were analyzed. Residue removal rates for each rotation were evaluated for conventional, mulch/reduced, and no-till field operations. The analyses indicated that potential removable maximum quantities range from nearly 5.5 million dry metric t/yr for a continuous corn rotation using conventional till in Kansas to more than 97 million dry metric t/yr for a corn-wheat rotation using no-till in Illinois.

Index Entries

Corn stover wheat straw rainfall erosion wind erosion tolerable soil loss 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard G. Nelson
    • 1
  • Marie Walsh
    • 3
  • John J. Sheehan
    • 2
  • Robin Graham
    • 3
  1. 1.Kansas State UniversityManhattan
  2. 2.National Renewable Energy LaboratoryGolden
  3. 3.Oak Ridge National LaboratoryOak Ridge

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