Obesity Surgery

, Volume 10, Issue 6, pp 530–539 | Cite as

Panniculectomy Adjuvant to Obesity Surgery

  • Daniel IgweJr
  • Malgorzata Stanczyk
  • Julius Tambi
  • Mal Fobi
  • Hoil Lee
  • Basil Felahy
Article

Background: Many patients who qualify for obesity surgery have a moderate to large panniculus (grade 1-5). They can benefit from panniculectomy done concurrently with gastric bypass (GBP) or subsequently after significant weight reduction, usually 18 months after the GBP. Method: Over the last 8 years, 2,231 bariatric operations were performed at the Center. 577 panniculectomies were done, with 428 (74.2%) concurrent with the GBP and 149 (25.8%) subsequent to the GBP. Results:The redundant pannus weighed from 5 to 54.5 kg. Wound problems occured in 15.1% of panniculectomies. Transfusion was necessary in 1.9%. Hospital stay was 4 to 5 days, and was no greater than in patients that underwent the GBP alone. Those with grades 3-5 suffer more back-pain and problems of hygiene resulting from panniculitis. Conclusion: A very redundant panniculus compounds the patient's physical, social and emotional problems. Where cardiopulmonary and other medical status are satisfactory,a panniculectomy may be offered to patients with a symptomatic panniculus at the time of bariatric surgery, as a physically beneficial and cost-effective adjuvant.

MORBID OBESITY BARIATRIC SURGERY GASTRIC BYPASS PANNICULECTOMY (ABDOMINAL LIPECTOMY) 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel IgweJr
    • Malgorzata Stanczyk
      • Julius Tambi
        • Mal Fobi
          • Hoil Lee
            • Basil Felahy

              There are no affiliations available

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