Chromatographia

, Volume 64, Issue 5–6, pp 307–311 | Cite as

Selective Determination of Sulfonamide Residues in Honey by SPE-RP-LC with UV Detection

Short Communication

Abstract

Solid-phase extraction was used to isolate sulfacetamide, sulfathiazole, sulfapyridine, sulfamerazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfamethoxazole from honey. The optimized procedure used polymeric Abselut Nexus cartridges and the sulfonamides were separated, in the isocratic mode, on an Inertsil ODS-3 (250 × 4 mm I.D., 5 μm) column, using methanol-0.05 M acetate buffer (pH 3.6) (20:80 v/v) with 1% (v/v) of acetic acid, UV detection at 263 nm and a flow-rate of 1 mL min−1. Caffeine was used as internal standard. Average recoveries of the analytes from spiked honey ranged from 80 to 117% and the detection limits based on a spiked honey extract were 20–25 μg kg−1.

Keywords

Column liquid chromatography Solid-phase extraction Sulfonamides Honey 

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlag/GWV Fachverlage GmbH 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of ChemistryAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece

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