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Predicting material strength, damage, and fracture The synergy between experiment and modeling

  • George T. (Rusty) Gray
  • Paul J. Maudlin
  • Lawrence M. Hull
  • Q. Ken Zuo
  • Shuh-Rong Chen
Features The Silicon Age

Conclusions

The Taylor cylinder impact test, the plane-strain tensile test, and explosively driven hemisphere test represent readily conducted experiments that probe the deformation, damage evolution, and fracture behavior of materials. Because these tests are very sensitive to large gradients of stress, strain, strain rate, and shock loading, we are using them to evaluate and validate the correctness of our mechanical models that are implemented and destined to be implemented into large-scale 3-D simulation codes.

Robust models that capture the physics of high-rate material response are required for developing predictive capability for highly dynamic events. The increased effort to link experiments and modeling within the computational mechanics community and the increased emphasis on code verification and validation within the Los Alamos National Laboratory defense programs are accelerating this development. These efforts are already receiving recognition through the recent establishment of verification and validation committees within various technical societies.

Keywords

Flow Stress Failure Analysis Strength Model Prevention Volume Material Instability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    S.R. Chen and G.T. Gray III: “Constitutive Behavior of Tantalum and Tantalum-Tungsten Alloys,” Metall. Mater. Trans. A, 1996, 27(10), p. 2994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    P.J. Maudlin, J.F. Bingert, J.W. House, and S.R. Chen: “On the Modeling of the Taylor Cylinder Impact Test for Orthotropic Textured Materials: Experiments and Simulations,” Int. J. Plasticity, 1999, 15, p. 139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    G.I. Taylor: “The Use of Flat-Ended Projectiles for Determining Dynamic Yield Stress. I. Theoretical Considerations,” Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A, 1948, 194(1038), p.289.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    J.W. Rudnicki and J.R. Rice: “Conditions for the Localization of Deformation in Pressure-Sensitive Dilatant Materials,” J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 1975, 23, p. 371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© ASM International 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • George T. (Rusty) Gray
    • 1
  • Paul J. Maudlin
    • 1
  • Lawrence M. Hull
    • 1
  • Q. Ken Zuo
    • 1
  • Shuh-Rong Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos Alamos

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