Regenerable sorbent for natural gas desulfurization

  • Gökhan Alptekin
  • Sarah DeVoss
  • Margarita Dubovik
  • John Monroe
  • Robert Amalfitano
  • Gordon Israelson
Fuel Cell Technology

Abstract

Sulfur-containing odorants are normally added to propane and natural gas supplies to facilitate leak detection. The sulfur in these fuels can poison the catalysts used in fuel-cell fuel-processing systems, thereby inactivating the surfaces of the fuel-cell anodes and resulting in degraded power generation performance. The sulfur content of natural gas or any hydrocarbon fuel needs to be reduced to very low levels to ensure long-term stable electrochemical performance for both high- and low-temperature fuel cells. This paper presents the development and test results of a new physical adsorbent for natural gas desulfurization. The sorbent effectively removes all sulfur-bearing compounds at ambient temperature with very high capacity. The new sorbent can also be fully regenerated by the temperature swing. In a series of tests, the sulfur adsorption capacity of the new material is compared with other commercially available and specially prepared sorbents. The results of the comparison tests are also summarized in this paper.

Keywords

dimethyl sulfide (DMS) fuel cells hydrogen sulfide (H2S) mercaptans natural gas desulfurization odorants physical adsorption regeneration solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sorbent SulfaTrap sulfur tetrahydrothiophene (THT) tert-butyl mercaptan (TBM) 

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gökhan Alptekin
    • 1
  • Sarah DeVoss
    • 1
  • Margarita Dubovik
    • 1
  • John Monroe
    • 1
  • Robert Amalfitano
    • 1
  • Gordon Israelson
    • 2
  1. 1.TDA Research, Inc.Wheat Ridge
  2. 2.Siemens Westinghouse Power CorporationPittsburgh

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