Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 55–71 | Cite as

Gas turbine disk-blade attachment crack

  • David L. Davidson
Peer Reviewed Articles

Abstract

Evaluation of a gas turbine disk revealed a crack in the blade attachment area. The subsequent effort to understand the origin of this crack led to a series of analyses that included computing the stresses on the attachment, characterization of fatigue crack growth, and a model for fretting fatigue crack growth. These elements were brought together to simulate the conditions that led to the cracking. It is concluded that the crack was probably caused by fretting fatigue induced by the stresses related to normal takeoff and landing cycles and exacerbated by aircraft maneuvers, and that short periods of blade resonance may have contributed to the cracking. If material had not been removed from the attachment surface of the disk by service-induced wear, it is likely more cracks would have been found.

Keywords

disk-blade attachment fatigue fatigue crack growth fretting gas-turbine engine simulation Ti-6Al-4V 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    D.L. Davidson: “Damage Mechanisms in High Cycle Fatigue,” Final Report to Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Contract F49620-96-0037, Southwest Research Institute, January 1999.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    A.E. Giannakopoulos, T.C. Lindley, and S. Suresh: Acta Mater., 1998, 46, pp. 2955–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    K.S. Chan, Y.-D. Lee, D.L. Davidson, and S.J. Hudak, Jr.: “A Fracture Mechanics Approach to High Cycle Fretting Based on the Worst Case Fret Concept, Part I: Model Development,” Int. J. Fract., 2001, 112, pp. 299–330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    K.S. Chan, D.L. Davidson, T.E. Owen, Y.-D. Lee, and S.J. Hudak, Jr.: “A Fracture Mechanics Approach to High Cycle Fretting Based on the Worst Case Fret Concept, Part II: Experimental Evaluation,” Int. J. Fract., 2001, 112, pp. 331–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    R.E. Dundas: “Design of the Gas Turbine,” Sawyer’s Gas Turbine Engineering Handbook, Vol. 1, 2nd ed., J.W. Sawyer, ed., Gas Turbine Publications, Stamford, CT, 1972, pp. 79–150.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    G.B. Sinclair and N.G. Cormier: “Contact Stresses in Dovetail Attachments: Physical Modeling,” 2000GT-356, Proc. ASME TURBOEXPO 2000, ASME, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    G.B. Sinclair and N.G. Cormier: “Contact Stresses in Dovetail Attachments: Alleviation via Precision Crowning,” 2001GT-0550, Proc. ASME TURBOEXPO 2001, ASME, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    C. Ruiz and K.C. Chen: C241/86, Proc. Inst. Mech. Engineers, 1986, 1, pp. 187–94.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    M. Ciavarella, D.A. Hills, and G. Monno: Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., 1998, 212(Part C), pp. 319–28.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    D. Nowell and D.A. Hills: J. Strain Anal., 1987, 22, pp. 177–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    M.P. Szolwinski, G. Harish, and T.N. Farris: Mech. Behavior Adv. Mater., 1998, 89, pp. 11–18.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Removed from service June 1997. Combined cycle count, ≈6100. Disk received from Kelly Air Logistics Center, San Antonio, TX.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    D.L. Davidson: in Fatigue Behavior of Titanium Alloys, R. Boyer, D. Eylon, and G. Lutjering, ed., TMS, Warrendale, PA, 1999, pp. 89–97.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    S.J. Hudak et al.: “High Cycle Fatigue of Turbine Engine Materials,” Final Report for AFRL Contract F33615-96-C-5269, Sec. 2, Southwest Research Institute, August 31, 1999.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    J.O. Peters, O. Roder, B.L. Boyce, A.W. Thompson, and R.O. Ritchie: “Role of Foreign Object Damage on Thresholds for High Cycle Fatigue in Ti-6Al-4V,” Metall. Mater. Trans. A, 2000, 31, pp. 1571–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    A.L. Dowson, M.D. Halliday, and C.J. Beevers: Mater. Des., 1993, 14, pp. 57–59.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    J.A. Hines, J.O. Peters, and G. Lutjering: in Fatigue Behavior of Titanium Alloys, R. Boyer, D. Eylon, and G. Lutjering, ed., TMS, Warrendale, PA, 1999, pp. 15–22.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    M.H. El Haddad, K.N. Smith, and T.H. Topper: J. Eng. Mater. Technol. (Trans. ASME), 1979, 101, pp. 42–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. A1.
    R.E. Dundas: “Design of the Gas Turbine,” Sawyer’s Gas Turbine Engineering Handbook, Vol. 1, 2nd ed., J.W. Sawyer, ed., Gas Turbine Publications, Stamford, CT, 1972, pp. 79–150.Google Scholar
  2. A2.
    G.B. Sinclair and N.G. Cormier: “Contact Stresses in Dovetail Attachments: Physical Modeling,” 2000GT-356, Proc. ASME TURBOEXPO 2000, ASME, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  3. A3.
    G.B. Sinclair and N.G. Cormier: “Contact Stresses in Dovetail Attachments: Alleviation via Precision Crowning,” 2001GT-0550, Proc. ASME TURBOEXPO 2001, ASME, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  4. A4.
    Engine Handbook, Directorate of Propulsion, Air Force Logistics Command, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, 1991.Google Scholar
  5. A5.
    R.C. Weast, ed.: Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, The Chemical Rubber Co., Cleveland, OH, 1966, pp. F6-F8.Google Scholar
  6. A6.
    D.L. Davidson: “Damage Mechanisms in High Cycle Fatigue,” Final Report to Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Contract F49620-96-0037, Southwest Research Institute, January 1999.Google Scholar
  7. A7.
    M.J. He and C. Ruiz: “Fatigue Life of Dovetail Joints: Verification of a Simple Biaxial Model,” Exp. Mech., 1989, 29, pp. 126–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. A8.
    A.E. Giannakopoulos, T.C. Lindley, and S. Suresh: “Aspects of Equivalence between Contact Mechanics and Fracture Mechanics: Theoretical Connections and a Life Prediction Methodology for Fretting Fatigue,” Acta Mater., 1998, 46, pp. 2955–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© ASM International 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Davidson
    • 1
  1. 1.Southwest Research Institute (retired)San Antonio

Personalised recommendations