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Journal of Thermal Spray Technology

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 57–67 | Cite as

In-situ particle temperature, velocity, and size measurements in DC Arc plasma thermal sprays

  • B. M. Cetegen
  • W. Yu
Article

Abstract

Particle temperature, velocity, and size measurements in DC arc plasma thermal sprays are reported in this article. Experiments were performed using a conventional DC are argon-hydrogen plasma with two 7 wt % yttria-stabilized zirconia powders injected transversely into the plasma jet. Measurements were performed along the axis of the plasma jet as well as at a number of radial locations at several axial positions. It was found that transverse injection of the powder results in the aerodynamic size classification of the powder with the large particles penetrating further across the plasma jet than the smaller particles, which were more readily swept by the high momentum of the plasma jet. Consequently, the particle temperatures were influenced by their degree of penetration into the core of the plasma jet. Average particle temperatures showed a good degree of uniformity radially and decayed with increasing downstream distance. When nanoclustered particles were injected into the plasma, significant differences in particle velocities and temperatures were observed in comparison to the conventional powder under the same plasma operating and particle injection conditions. These differences were attributed to the penetration characteristics of the powder into the plasma jet and the consequent effects on the particle heat up. Hence, axial injection of powder into plasma jets may provide more uniform and axisymmetric particle property distributions compared to the transverse injection schemes.

Keywords

DC arc plasmas in-flight particle temperature optical diagnostics particle injection thermal barrier coatings velocity and size measurements 

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Copyright information

© ASM International 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. M. Cetegen
    • 1
  • W. Yu
    • 1
  1. 1.Mechanical Engineering DepartmentUniversity of ConnecticutStorrs

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