Advertisement

Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance

, Volume 14, Issue 6, pp 681–685 | Cite as

The use of β titanium alloys in the aerospace industry

  • R. R. Boyer
  • R. D. Briggs
Article

Abstract

Beta titanium alloys have been available since the 1950s (Ti-13V-11Cr-3Mo or B120VCA), but significant applications of these alloys, beyond the SR-71 Blackbird, have been slow in coming. The next significant usage of a β alloy did not occur until the mid-1980s on the B-1B bomber. This aircraft used Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn sheet due to its capability for strip rolling, improved formability, and higher strength than Ti-6Al-4V. The next major usage was on a commercial aircraft, the Boeing 777, which made extensive use of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al high-strength forgings. Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn environmental control system ducting, castings, and springs were also used, along with Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (β-C) springs. Beta-21S was also introduced for high-temperature usage. More recent work at Boeing has focused on the development of Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr, a high-strength alloy that can be used at higher strength than Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al and is much more robust; it has a much wider, or friendlier, processing window. This, along with additional studies at Boeing, and from within the aerospace industry in general will be discussed in detail, summarizing applications and the rationale for the selection of this alloy system for aerospace applications.

Keywords

forgings Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R.R. Boyer, Applications of Beta Titanium Alloys in Airframes,Beta Titanium Alloys in the 1990’s, D. Eylon, R.R. Boyer, and D.A. Koss, Ed., The Materials Society, 1993, p 335–346Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R.R. Boyer, Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al Properties,Beta Titanium Alloys in the 1980’s, R.R. Boyer and H.W. Rosenberg, Ed., Metallurgical Society of AIME, 1984, p 441–456Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    K.-H. Rendigs, Titanium Products Used at AIRBUS,Ti-2003 Science and Technology, G. Lütjering and J. Albrecht, Ed., DGM, Wiley VCH, Weinheim, Germany, 2004, p 2659–2671Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    G. Terlinde and G. Fischer, Beta Titanium Alloys,Titanium’95: Science and Technology, P.A. Blenkinsop, W.J. Evans, and H.M. Flower, Ed., Institute of Materials, 1996, p 2177–2194Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    C. Pepka, “Beta Alloy Springs in the 00’s, Renton,” presented at the Beta Titanium Alloys in the 00’s Symposium (San Francisco, CA), Annual Meeting of The Materials Society, February 2005Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    A.M. Sherman and S.R. Seagle, Torsional Properties and Performance of Beta Titanium Alloy Automotive Suspension Springs,Beta Titanium Alloys in the 1980’s, R.R. Boyer and H.W. Rosenberg, Ed., AIME, Metallurgical Society of AIME, 1984, p 281–293Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    G. Antoine, J. Panter, and M.-H. Campagnac, “Application of Ti-10-2-3 in Rotor Hub Parts of EUROCOPTER,” presented at the Beta Titanium Alloys in the 00’s Symposium (San Francisco, CA), Annual Meeting of The Materials Society, February 2005Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    R.R. Boyer and G.W. Kuhlman, Processing Properties Relationships of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al,Metall. Trans. A, Vol 18 (No. 12), 1987, p 2095–2103CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    J.C. Fanning and R.R. Boyer,Ti-2003 Science and Technology, Wiley VCH, Weinheim, Germany, 2004, p 2643Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    J. Panter, A. Dallz, K.-H. Rendigs, N. Hellard, and W. Gerhard, “Influence of Thermo-Mechanical Treatments on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Near Beta Titanium Alloy VST 55531,” presented at the Beta Titanium Alloys in the 00’s Symposium, Annual Meeting of The Materials Society (San Francisco, CA), February 2005Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    S. Veeck, D. Lee, R. Boyer, and R. Briggs, The Castability of Ti-5553 Alloy: Its Microstructure and Properties,Advanced Materials & Processes, Vol 162 (No. 10), 2004, p 47–49Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    S. Buzolits, Tough Titanium Fasteners,Advanced Materials & Processes, Vol 161 (No. 11), 2003, p 53Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    S. Buzolits and SPS Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA, “SPS M761 Titanium Alloy: A New Fastener Alloy to Replace Alloy Steel and CRES,” paper presented at Aeromat 2004 (Seattle, WA), June 7–10, 2004Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    P.J. Bania, TiPro (Henderson, NV), personal communication, 2004Google Scholar

Copyright information

© ASM International 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. R. Boyer
    • 1
  • R. D. Briggs
    • 1
  1. 1.The Boeing CompanySeattle

Personalised recommendations