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Chinese Science Bulletin

, Volume 47, Issue 11, pp 902–905 | Cite as

Arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris Vittata L. and its arsenic accumulation

  • Chen Tongbin 
  • Wei Chaoyang 
  • Huang Zechun 
  • Huang Qifei 
  • Lu Quanguo 
  • Fan Zilian 
Notes

Abstract

An arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. (Chinese brake) was first discovered in China by means of field survey and greenhouse cultivation. Field survey showed that Chinese brake had large accumulating capacity to arsenic; the orders of arsenic content in different parts of the fern were as follows: leaves>leafstalks>roots, which is totally different from that of ordinary plants; bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts of the fern decreased as a power function of soil arsenic contents. In the control of pot trials with normal unpolluted soil containing 9 mg/kg of arsenic, the bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts and rhizoids of Chinese brake were as high as 71 and 80 respectively. Greenhouse cultivation in the contaminated soil from mining areas has shown that more than 1 times greater arsenic can be accumulated in the leaves of the fern than that of field samples with the largest content of 5070 mg/kg As on a dry matter basis. During greenhouse cultivation, arsenic content in the leaves of the fern increased linearly with time prolonging. Not only has Chinese brake extraordinary tolerance and accumulation to arsenic, but it grew rapidly with great biomass, wide distribution and easy adaptation to different environmental conditions as well. Therefore, it has great potential in future remediation of arsenic contamination. It also demonstrates important value for studies of arsenic physiology and biochemistry such as arsenic absorption, translocation and detoxification mechanisms in plants.

Keywords

hyperaccumlator Chinese brake arsenic bioaccumulation coefficients 

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Copyright information

© Science in China Press 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chen Tongbin 
    • 1
  • Wei Chaoyang 
    • 1
  • Huang Zechun 
    • 1
  • Huang Qifei 
    • 1
  • Lu Quanguo 
    • 1
  • Fan Zilian 
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources ResearchChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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