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Demography

, Volume 44, Issue 2, pp 289–305 | Cite as

Education of adult children and mortality of their elderly parents in Taiwan

  • Zachary Zimmer
  • Linda G. Martin
  • Mary Beth Ofstedal
  • Yi-Li Chuang
Article

Abstract

In societies in which families are highly integrated, the education of family members may be linked to survival. Such may be the case in Taiwan, where there are large gaps in levels of education across generations and high levels of resource transfers between family members. This study employs 14 years of longitudinal data from Taiwan to examine the combined effects of the education of older adults and their adult children on the mortality outcomes of older adults. We use nested Gompertz hazard models to evaluate the importance of the education of an older adult and his or her highest-educated child after controlling for socioeconomic, demographic, and health characteristics at baseline. To gain further insight, we fit additional models based on the sample stratified by whether older adults report serious diseases at baseline. The results indicate that the educational levels of both older adults and children are associated with older adult mortality, but children’s education appears more important when we examine the mortality of only those older adults who already report a serious disease. This finding suggests that there may be different roles for education in the onset versus the progression of a health problem that may lead to death.

Keywords

Functional Limitation Adult Child Junior High School Adult Mortality Elderly Parent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zachary Zimmer
    • 1
  • Linda G. Martin
    • 2
  • Mary Beth Ofstedal
    • 3
  • Yi-Li Chuang
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of Public and International AffairsUniversity of UtahSalt Lake City
  2. 2.Institute of MedicineNational AcademiesUSA
  3. 3.Institute for Social ResearchUniversity of MichiganUSA
  4. 4.Bureau of Health PromotionDepartment of HealthTaiwan

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