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Demography

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 109–129 | Cite as

Health consequences of forest fires in Indonesia

  • Elizabeth Frankenberg
  • Douglas McKee
  • Duncan Thomas
Article

Abstract

We combined data from a population-based longitudinal survey with satellite measures of aerosol levels to assess the impact of smoke from forest fires that blanketed the Indonesian islands of Kalimantan and Sumatra in late 1997 on adult health. To account for unobserved differences between haze and nonhaze areas, we compared changes in the health of individual respondents. Between 1993 and 1997, individuals who were exposed to haze experienced greater increases in difficulty with activities of daily living than did their counterparts in nonhaze areas. The results for respiratory and general health, although more complicated to interpret, suggest that haze had a negative impact on these dimensions of health.

Keywords

General Health Status Heavy Load World Trade Center Poor General Health Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth Frankenberg
    • 1
  • Douglas McKee
    • 2
  • Duncan Thomas
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUCLALos Angeles
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsUCLAUSA

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