Demography

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 109–128

Mortality among elderly hispanics in the United States: Past evidence and new results

  • Irma T. Elo
  • Cassio M. Turra
  • Bert Kestenbaum
  • B. Reneé Ferguson
Article

Abstract

We used vital records and census data and Medicare and NUMIDENT records to estimate age-and sex-specific death rates for elderly non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics, including five Hispanic subgroups: persons born in Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico, other foreign countries, and the United States. We found that corrections for data errors in vital and census records lead to substantial changes in death rates for Hispanics and that conventionally constructed Hispanic death rates are lower than rates based on Medicare-NUMIDENT records. Both sources revealed a Hispanic mortality advantage relative to non-Hispanic whites that holds for most Hispanic subgroups. We also present a new methodology for inferring Hispanic origin from a combination of surname, given name, and county of residence.

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Copyright information

© Population Association of America 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irma T. Elo
    • 1
  • Cassio M. Turra
    • 1
  • Bert Kestenbaum
    • 2
  • B. Reneé Ferguson
    • 2
  1. 1.Population Studies CenterUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia
  2. 2.Social Security AdministrationUSA

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