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Clays and Clay Minerals

, Volume 41, Issue 6, pp 639–644 | Cite as

The Near-Infrared Combination Band Frequencies of Dioctahedral Smectites, Micas, and Illites

  • James L. Post
  • Paul N. Noble
Article

Abstract

The highest frequency near-infrared (NIR) combination bands for specimens of four species of mica—montmorillonite-beidellite, illite, chlorite, and kaolinite—were correlated with respect to Al2O3 content. A direct linear correlation was found between the combination band positions and the Al2O3 contents of the montmorillonite-beidellite series, which may be given as: ν̄ cm−1 = (5.38 ± 0.04) (% Al2O3) + (4412.8 ± 0.9). A similar linear correlation for muscovite is: ν̄ cm−1 = (6.10 ± 0.25) (% Al2O3) + (4434.1 ± 8.3).

Possible NIR band interferences are shown for different mineral mixtures, along with the correlation of different illites with muscovite. No combination bands were found in the frequency region 4425 cm−1 to 4625 cm−1 for specimens in which the Al2O3 content was only in the tetrahedral layer sites.

Key Words

Al content Dioctahedral smectites Micas NIR spectra 

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Copyright information

© The Clay Minerals Society 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • James L. Post
    • 1
  • Paul N. Noble
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil Engineering and Chemistry DepartmentCalifornia State UniversitySacramentoUSA

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