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Clays and Clay Minerals

, Volume 41, Issue 3, pp 317–327 | Cite as

Preparation and Characterization of Hydroxy-Feal Pillared Clays

  • Dongyuan Zhao
  • Guojia Wang
  • Yashu Yang
  • Xiexian Guo
  • Qibin Wang
  • Jiyao Ren
Article

Abstract

Solutions containing hydroxy-FeAl oligocations (HFA) were prepared by two procedures: (1) treatment of a mixture of FeCl3 and AlCl3 with aqueous Na2CO3, followed by aging of the product and (2) preliminary preparation and aging of hydroxy-Al13 oligocations followed by reaction of the latter with aqueous FeCl3. Ion-exchange of Na-montmorillonite with HFA yield pillared clay (designated as FeAl-PILC) with d(001) values of 1.98–1.56 nm and a surface area of 230 m2/g. The pillar structure, thermal stability, surface acidity, and reduction behavior of the pillared clays were determined by 27Al-NMR, XRD, DTA, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Py-IR, TPD, TPR. Fe/Al ratios greatly affect the pillar structure, surface area and thermal stability of FeAl-PILC. The pillar in FeAl-PILC with Fe/Al ratio <0.5 has a Keggin structure, similar to that of Al-PILC, but the pillar structures of FeAl-PILC with Fe/Al ≥0.5 are the ferric tripolymer species similar to those of Fe-PILC. The basal spacings, surface area, and thermal stability are decreased with increasing Fe/Al ratio. There is relatively strong interaction between Fe and Al in the pillars. The interaction is enhanced with decreasing Fe/Al ratio. Reduction of the Fe phase in FeAl-PILC was reduced by the interaction of Fe with Al.

Key Words

Acidity Hydroxy-FeAl pillars Pillared clay Preparation Stability 

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Copyright information

© The Clay Minerals Society 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dongyuan Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Guojia Wang
    • 2
  • Yashu Yang
    • 3
  • Xiexian Guo
    • 3
  • Qibin Wang
    • 4
  • Jiyao Ren
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Fine Chemical TechnologyShenyang Institute of Chemical TechnologyShenyangP. R. China
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryJilin UniversityChangchunP.R. China
  3. 3.Dalian Institute of Chemical PhysicsChinese Academy of ScienceDalianP.R. China
  4. 4.Department of Fine Chemical TechnologyShenyang Institute of Chemical TechnologyShenyangP. R. China

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