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Clays and Clay Minerals

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 11–20 | Cite as

Effect of Manganese on the Transformation of Ferrihydrite into Goethite and Jacobsite in Alkaline Media

  • R. M. Cornell
  • R. Giovanoli
Article

Abstract

In the presence of Mn(II), ferrihydrite transforms into Mn-goethite and/or jacobsite. Chemical analysis showed that as much as 15 mole % Mn replaced Fe in the goethite structure. If Mn(III) replaced Mn(II), the formation of jacobsite was suppressed; ferrihydrite transformed into Mn-goethite, and, at high Mn(III) concentrations, a 7-Å phyllomanganate. Low levels of Mn(II) retarded the transformation of ferrihydrite only slightly, whereas in an Mn(III) system the nucleation and growth of Mn-goethite were both hindered. Mn-goethite nucleated in solution, whereas jacobsite appeared to form by interaction of dissolved Mn(II) species with ferrihydrite. Mn suppressed the formation of hematite in these systems; however, Mn-hematite containing as much as 5 mole % Mn was induced to form at pH 8 by adding oxalate to the system. Transmission electron micrographs showed that goethite crystals grown in the presence of Mn were long (≤2 μm) and thin and commonly contained etch pits. The presence of Mn appears to have promoted twinning.

Key Words

Ferrihydrite Goethite Jacobsite Manganese Phyllomanganate Synthesis Transmission electron microscopy 

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Copyright information

© The Clay Minerals Society 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. M. Cornell
    • 1
  • R. Giovanoli
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Inorganic ChemistryUniversity of BerneBerne 9Switzerland
  2. 2.Laboratory of Electron MicroscopyUniversity of BerneBerne 9Switzerland

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