Biological Procedures Online

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 61–66 | Cite as

Serum-free cryopreservation of five mammalian cell lines in either a pelleted or suspended state

Open Access
Article

Abstract

Herein we have explored two practical aspects of cryopreserving cultured mammalian cells during routine laboratory maintenance. First, we have examined the possibility of using a serum-free, hence more affordable, cryopreservative. Using five mammalian lines (Crandell Feline Kidney, MCF7, A72, WI 38 and NB324K), we found that the serum-free alternative preserves nearly as efficiently as the serum-containing preservatives. Second, we compared cryostorage of those cells in suspended versus a pellet form using both aforementioned cryopreservatives. Under our conditions, cells were in general recovered equally well in a suspended versus a pellet form.

Indexing terms

Cryopreservation Cells, Cultured Culture Media, Serum-Free 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Biology DepartmentChadron State CollegeChadron
  2. 2.Mathematics DepartmentChadron State CollegeChadron

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