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The Landmark Series: Preoperative Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

Abstract

The surgical treatment of pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is plagued by high rates of distant recurrences despite complete resection, highlighting the importance of systemic therapy. Historically, patients with PDAC have been treated with postoperative therapy, but this sequencing strategy can be associated with the inability to complete therapy due to perioperative complications and prolonged recovery. In addition, a subset of patients progress early, irrespective of whether surgery is performed, highlighting the systemic nature of this disease. Preoperative therapy has increasingly been utilized in clinical practice, but studies examining its benefits are limited. In this Landmark Series, we will review seminal studies for resectable and borderline resectable PDAC.

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Correspondence to Sameer H. Patel MD, FACS.

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Patel, S.H., Katz, M.H.G. & Ahmad, S.A. The Landmark Series: Preoperative Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer. Ann Surg Oncol 28, 4104–4129 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1245/s10434-021-10075-1

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