Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 14, Issue 9, pp 2628–2635 | Cite as

Overexpression of RhoE Has a Prognostic Value in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

  • Cuiyan Zhang
  • Fang Zhou
  • Ning Li
  • Susheng Shi
  • Xiaoli Feng
  • Zhaoli Chen
  • Jie Hang
  • Bin Qiu
  • Baozhong Li
  • Sheng Chang
  • Junting Wan
  • Kang Shao
  • Xuezhong Xing
  • Xiaogang Tan
  • Zhen Wang
  • Meihua Xiong
  • Jie He
Thoracic Oncology

Abstract

Background

Increasing evidence has suggested that RhoE plays an important role in carcinogenesis and progression. However, the correlation between RhoE expression and clinical outcome in lung cancer has not been investigated.

Methods

RhoE expression was detected by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarray containing samples from 115 patients with non–small cell lung cancer with a median follow-up of 54 months.

Results

RhoE was overexpressed in the cytoplasm of lung cancer cells compared with undetectable expression of RhoE in the adjacent nontumoral cells. Patients with RhoE-negative tumors had substantially longer cancer-related survival than did patients with RhoE-positive tumors. Multivariate analysis showed that RhoE overexpression was an independent marker for cancer-related survival in the entire population after adjusting for other prognostic factors.

Conclusions

RhoE expression may serve as an unfavorable prognostic factor in patients with non–small cell lung cancer.

Keywords

Non–small cell lung cancer RhoE Prognosis 

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cuiyan Zhang
    • 1
  • Fang Zhou
    • 1
  • Ning Li
    • 1
  • Susheng Shi
    • 2
  • Xiaoli Feng
    • 2
  • Zhaoli Chen
    • 1
  • Jie Hang
    • 1
  • Bin Qiu
    • 1
  • Baozhong Li
    • 1
  • Sheng Chang
    • 3
  • Junting Wan
    • 1
  • Kang Shao
    • 1
  • Xuezhong Xing
    • 1
  • Xiaogang Tan
    • 1
  • Zhen Wang
    • 1
  • Meihua Xiong
    • 1
  • Jie He
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Thoracic SurgeryPeking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.PathologyCancer Hospital (Institute), Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical SciencesBeijingChina
  3. 3.Renmin Hospital, Wuhan UniversityWuhanChina

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