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Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 25, Issue 11, pp 3396–3403 | Cite as

Glucose Transporter 1 Gene Variants Predict the Prognosis of Patients with Early-Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  • Sook Kyung Do
  • Ji Yun Jeong
  • Shin Yup LeeEmail author
  • Jin Eun Choi
  • Mi Jeong Hong
  • Hyo-Gyoung Kang
  • Won Kee Lee
  • Yangki Seok
  • Eung Bae Lee
  • Kyung Min Shin
  • Seung Soo Yoo
  • Jaehee Lee
  • Seung Ick Cha
  • Chang Ho Kim
  • Michael L. Neugent
  • Justin Goodwin
  • Jung-whan Kim
  • Jae Yong ParkEmail author
Translational Research and Biomarkers

Abstract

Background

This study was conducted to investigate whether polymorphisms of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) gene are associated with the prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after surgical resection.

Methods

Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GLUT1 were investigated in a total of 354 patients with NSCLC who underwent curative surgery. The association of the SNPs with patients’ survival was analyzed.

Results

Among the five SNPs investigated, two SNPs (GLUT1 rs3820589T > A and rs4658G > C) were significantly associated with OS in multivariate analyses. GLUT1 rs3820589T > A was associated with significantly better OS (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.34–0.94, P = 0.03, under dominant model), and rs4658G > C was associated with significantly worse OS (aHR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.09–3.33, P = 0.02, under recessive model). In the stratified analysis by tumor histology, the effect of these SNPs on OS was only significant in squamous cell carcinoma but not in adenocarcinoma. When the two SNPs were combined, OS decreased as the number of bad genotypes increased (Ptrend = 4 × 10−3).

Conclusions

This study suggests that genetic variation in GLUT1 may be useful in predicting survival of patients with early stage NSCLC.

Notes

Acknowledgment

This study was supported in part by the National R&D Program for Cancer Control, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Republic of Korea (1720040), and in part by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2016R1A1A1A05005315).

Disclosure

The authors declared that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

10434_2018_6677_MOESM1_ESM.pptx (173 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PPTX 172 kb)
10434_2018_6677_MOESM2_ESM.pptx (56 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (PPTX 55 kb)
10434_2018_6677_MOESM3_ESM.docx (29 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (DOCX 28 kb)

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sook Kyung Do
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ji Yun Jeong
    • 3
  • Shin Yup Lee
    • 4
    • 5
    Email author
  • Jin Eun Choi
    • 1
    • 6
  • Mi Jeong Hong
    • 1
    • 6
  • Hyo-Gyoung Kang
    • 1
    • 6
  • Won Kee Lee
    • 7
  • Yangki Seok
    • 4
    • 8
  • Eung Bae Lee
    • 4
    • 8
  • Kyung Min Shin
    • 9
  • Seung Soo Yoo
    • 4
    • 5
  • Jaehee Lee
    • 5
  • Seung Ick Cha
    • 5
  • Chang Ho Kim
    • 5
  • Michael L. Neugent
    • 10
  • Justin Goodwin
    • 11
    • 12
  • Jung-whan Kim
    • 10
  • Jae Yong Park
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, School of MedicineKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.BK21 Plus KNU Biomedical Convergence Program, Department of Biomedical ScienceKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Pathology, School of MedicineKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Lung Cancer CenterKyungpook National University Chilgok HospitalDaeguRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Department of Internal Medicine, School of MedicineKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  6. 6.Cell and Matrix Research Institute, School of MedicineKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  7. 7.Medical Research Collaboration Center in Kyungpook National University Hospital and School of MedicineKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  8. 8.Department of Thoracic Surgery, School of MedicineKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  9. 9.Department of Radiology, School of MedicineKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  10. 10.Department of Biological SciencesThe University of Texas at DallasRichardsonUSA
  11. 11.Yale School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  12. 12.Yale Graduate School of Arts and SciencesNew HavenUSA

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