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Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 23, Issue 12, pp 3843–3849 | Cite as

Comparative Analysis of Breast Cancer Phenotypes in African American, White American, and West Versus East African patients: Correlation Between African Ancestry and Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

  • Evelyn Jiagge
  • Aisha Souleiman Jibril
  • Dhananjay Chitale
  • Jessica M. Bensenhaver
  • Baffour Awuah
  • Mark Hoenerhoff
  • Ernest Adjei
  • Mahteme Bekele
  • Engida Abebe
  • S. David Nathanson
  • Kofi Gyan
  • Barbara Salem
  • Joseph Oppong
  • Francis Aitpillah
  • Ishmael Kyei
  • Ernest Osei Bonsu
  • Erica Proctor
  • Sofia D. Merajver
  • Max Wicha
  • Azadeh Stark
  • Lisa A. Newman
Breast Oncology

Abstract

Introduction

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is more common among African American (AA) and western sub-Saharan African breast cancer (BC) patients compared with White/Caucasian Americans (WA) and Europeans. Little is known about TNBC in east Africa.

Methods

Invasive BC diagnosed 1998–2014 were evaluated: WA and AA patients from the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan; Ghanaian/west Africans from the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana; and Ethiopian/east Africans from the St. Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical College in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2/neu expression was performed in Michigan on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples from all cases.

Results

A total of 234 Ghanaian (mean age 49 years), 94 Ethiopian (mean age 43 years), 272 AA (mean age 60 years), and 321 WA (mean age 62 years; p = 0.001) patients were compared. ER-negative and TNBC were more common among Ghanaian and AA compared with WA and Ethiopian cases (frequency ER-negativity 71.1 and 37.1 % vs. 19.8 and 28.6 % respectively, p < 0.0001; frequency TNBC 53.2 and 29.8 % vs. 15.5 and 15.0 %, respectively, p < 0.0001). Among patients younger than 50 years, prevalence of TNBC remained highest among Ghanaians (50.8 %) and AA (34.3 %) compared with WA and Ethiopians (approximately 16 % in each; p = 0.0002).

Conclusions

This study confirms an association between TNBC and West African ancestry; TNBC frequency among AA patients is intermediate between WA and Ghanaian/West Africans consistent with genetic admixture following the west Africa-based trans-Atlantic slave trade. TNBC frequency was low among Ethiopians/East Africans; this may reflect less shared ancestry between AA and Ethiopians.

Keywords

Breast Cancer African American African American Patient African Ancestry Male Breast Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by research funds contributed by the following agencies/organizations: Henry Ford Health System International Center for the Study of Breast Cancer Subtypes, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Think Pink Rocks, QVC Fashion Footwear New York City, Susan and Richard Bayer Breast Cancer Research Fund, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evelyn Jiagge
    • 1
    • 2
  • Aisha Souleiman Jibril
    • 3
  • Dhananjay Chitale
    • 4
  • Jessica M. Bensenhaver
    • 5
    • 6
  • Baffour Awuah
    • 2
  • Mark Hoenerhoff
    • 7
  • Ernest Adjei
    • 2
  • Mahteme Bekele
    • 8
  • Engida Abebe
    • 8
  • S. David Nathanson
    • 5
    • 6
  • Kofi Gyan
    • 6
  • Barbara Salem
    • 6
  • Joseph Oppong
    • 2
  • Francis Aitpillah
    • 2
  • Ishmael Kyei
    • 2
  • Ernest Osei Bonsu
    • 2
  • Erica Proctor
    • 5
    • 6
  • Sofia D. Merajver
    • 1
  • Max Wicha
    • 1
  • Azadeh Stark
    • 4
  • Lisa A. Newman
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer CenterAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Department of OncologyKomfo Anokye Teaching HospitalKumasiGhana
  3. 3.Department of PathologySt. Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical CollegeAddis AbabaEthiopia
  4. 4.Department of PathologyHenry Ford Health SystemDetroitUSA
  5. 5.Department of SurgeryHenry Ford Health SystemDetroitUSA
  6. 6.International Center for the Study of Breast Cancer SubtypesHenry Ford Health SystemDetroitUSA
  7. 7.In Vivo Animal Core, Unit for Laboratory Animal MedicineUniversity of Michigan Medical SchoolAnn ArborUSA
  8. 8.Department of SurgerySt. Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical CollegeAddis AbabaEthiopia

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