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Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 23, Issue 10, pp 3190–3198 | Cite as

Operative and Oncologic Outcomes in 9861 Patients with Operable Breast Cancer: Single-Institution Analysis of Breast Conservation with Oncoplastic Reconstruction

  • Stacey A. Carter
  • Genevieve R. Lyons
  • Henry M. Kuerer
  • Roland L. BassettJr.
  • Scott Oates
  • Alastair Thompson
  • Abigail S. Caudle
  • Elizabeth A. Mittendorf
  • Isabelle Bedrosian
  • Anthony Lucci
  • Sarah M. DeSnyder
  • Gildy Babiera
  • Min Yi
  • Donald P. Baumann
  • Mark W. Clemens
  • Patrick B. Garvey
  • Kelly K. Hunt
  • Rosa F. HwangEmail author
Breast Oncology

Abstract

Background

Oncoplastic reconstruction is an approach that enables patients with locally advanced or adversely located tumors to undergo breast conserving surgery (BCS). The objectives were to identify the use of BCS with oncoplastic reconstruction (BCS + R) and determine the operative and oncologic outcomes compared with other breast surgical procedures for breast cancer.

Methods

This retrospective cohort study interrogated a single institution’s prospectively maintained databases to identify patients who underwent surgery for breast cancer between 2007 and 2014. Surgeries were categorized as BCS, BCS + R, total mastectomy (TM), or TM with immediate reconstruction (TM + R). Demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and postoperative complications were analyzed.

Results

There were 10,607 operations performed for 9861 patients. Median follow-up was 3.4 years (range, 0–9.1 years). The use of BCS + R had a nearly fourfold increase in the percentage of all breast cancer surgeries during the study period; 75 % of patients who underwent BCS + R had a T1 or T2 tumor. There was no difference in the use of BCS + R compared with BCS for any quadrant of the breast except the lower outer quadrant (11.1 vs. 6.8 %; p < .0001). BCS + R had a lower rate of seroma formation (13.4 vs. 18 %; p = .002) and positive or close margins compared with BCS (5.8 vs. 8.3 %; p = .04). There was no difference in overall survival or recurrence-free survival when comparing BCS and BCS + R.

Conclusions

Patients undergoing BCS + R are not disadvantaged in terms of complications and short-term (3-year) outcomes compared with BCS patients or patients who underwent TM.

Keywords

Overall Survival Total Mastectomy Close Margin Mastectomy Rate Autologous Reconstruction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by the Cancer Center Support Grant (NCI Grant P30 CA016672). We greatly wish to acknowledge Deborah Adair, Helen Zou, and Kelly Merriman, MPH, PhD, for their assistance with data collection for this project.

Supplementary material

10434_2016_5407_MOESM1_ESM.docx (46 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 46 kb)

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stacey A. Carter
    • 1
  • Genevieve R. Lyons
    • 2
  • Henry M. Kuerer
    • 1
  • Roland L. BassettJr.
    • 2
  • Scott Oates
    • 3
  • Alastair Thompson
    • 1
  • Abigail S. Caudle
    • 1
  • Elizabeth A. Mittendorf
    • 1
  • Isabelle Bedrosian
    • 1
  • Anthony Lucci
    • 1
  • Sarah M. DeSnyder
    • 1
  • Gildy Babiera
    • 1
  • Min Yi
    • 1
  • Donald P. Baumann
    • 3
  • Mark W. Clemens
    • 3
  • Patrick B. Garvey
    • 3
  • Kelly K. Hunt
    • 1
  • Rosa F. Hwang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Breast Surgical OncologyThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiostatisticsThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Center for Reconstructive SurgeryThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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