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Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 21, Supplement 4, pp 640–647 | Cite as

Loss of CDCP1 Expression Promotes Invasiveness and Poor Prognosis in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  • Genta Sawada
  • Yusuke Takahashi
  • Atsushi Niida
  • Teppei Shimamura
  • Junji Kurashige
  • Tae Matsumura
  • Hiroki Ueo
  • Ryutaro Uchi
  • Yuki Takano
  • Masami Ueda
  • Hidenari Hirata
  • Shotaro Sakimura
  • Yoshiaki Shinden
  • Hidetoshi Eguchi
  • Tomoya Sudo
  • Keishi Sugimachi
  • Satoru Miyano
  • Yuichiro Doki
  • Masaki Mori
  • Koshi MimoriEmail author
Translational Research and Biomarkers

Abstract

Background

Human CDCP1 gene, located on chromosome 3p21.3, is a transmembrane glycoprotein widely expressed in epithelial tissues, and its role in cancer remains to be understood.

Methods

Using microarray profiles of gene expression and copy number data from 69 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) samples, we performed informatics analyses to reveal the significance of CDCP1 expression. We also performed migration and invasion assays of siRNA-targeted CDCP1-transfected cells and CDCP1-overexpressing cell in vitro. Moreover, we evaluated the clinical magnitude of CDCP1 expression in esophageal squamous cell cancer cases.

Results

Allelic loss of chromosome 3p was confirmed by copy number analysis. The expression level of CDCP1 in tumor tissue was significantly lower than that in corresponding normal tissue. siRNA targeting of CDCP1 promoted the migratory and invasive abilities of esophageal cancer cell lines, whereas both abilities were reduced in CDCP1-overexpressing cells. Gene set enrichment analysis showed that expression levels of CDCP1 were associated with tumor differentiation and metastasis, consistent with the result of clinicopathologic analyses. Finally, multivariate analysis revealed that the expression level of CDCP1 was an independent prognostic factor for survival.

Conclusions

Loss of CDCP1 expression may be a novel indicator for biological aggressiveness in ESCC.

Keywords

Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lung Adenocarcinoma Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Copy Number Alteration Allelic Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the following Grants and foundations: Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (21229015); Funding Program for Next Generation World-Leading Researchers (LS094). We thank T. Shimo-oka, M. Kasagi, T. Kohno, K. Oda, M. Aoyagi, and T. Kawano for their assistance with molecular biological procedures.

Disclosure

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

10434_2014_3740_MOESM1_ESM.tif (151 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (TIFF 151 kb)
10434_2014_3740_MOESM2_ESM.tif (96 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (TIFF 96 kb)

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Genta Sawada
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yusuke Takahashi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Atsushi Niida
    • 2
  • Teppei Shimamura
    • 2
  • Junji Kurashige
    • 1
  • Tae Matsumura
    • 1
    • 3
  • Hiroki Ueo
    • 1
  • Ryutaro Uchi
    • 1
  • Yuki Takano
    • 1
  • Masami Ueda
    • 1
    • 3
  • Hidenari Hirata
    • 1
  • Shotaro Sakimura
    • 1
  • Yoshiaki Shinden
    • 1
  • Hidetoshi Eguchi
    • 1
  • Tomoya Sudo
    • 1
  • Keishi Sugimachi
    • 1
  • Satoru Miyano
    • 2
  • Yuichiro Doki
    • 3
  • Masaki Mori
    • 3
  • Koshi Mimori
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Beppu HospitalKyushu UniversityBeppuJapan
  2. 2.Laboratory of DNA Information Analysis, Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical ScienceUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of MedicineOsaka UniversitySuitaJapan

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