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Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 20, Issue 11, pp 3391–3397 | Cite as

Cutaneous Angiosarcoma: A Single-Institution Experience

  • Matthew C. Perez
  • Tapan A. Padhya
  • Jane L. Messina
  • Ryan S. Jackson
  • Ricardo J. Gonzalez
  • Marilyn M. Bui
  • G. Douglas Letson
  • C. W. Cruse
  • Robert S. Lavey
  • David Cheong
  • Meghan R. Forster
  • William J. Fulp
  • Vernon K. Sondak
  • Jonathan S. Zager
Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

Abstract

Background

Cutaneous angiosarcoma (CAS) is a rare, aggressive vascular sarcoma with a poor prognosis, historically associated with 5-year overall survival (OS) rates between 10 and 30 %.

Methods

This is a single-institution retrospective review of patients treated for CAS from 1999–2011. Demographics, primary tumor characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed.

Results

A total of 88 patients were identified (median age 70 years and 57 % female). Median tumor size was 3 cm. Median follow-up was 22 months. The 5-year OS and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were 35.2 and 32.3 %, respectively; median was 22.1 months. Also, 36 patients (41 %) received surgery alone, 7 (8 %) received XRT alone, and 41 (47 %) received surgery and XRT. Of the 67 of 88 patients who were disease-free after treatment, 33 (50 %) recurred (median of 12.3 months). Surgery alone had the highest 5-year OS (46.9 %) and RFS (39.9 %) (p = ns). Four presentation groups were identified: (1) XRT-induced, n = 30 (34 %), 26 of 30 occurred in females with a prior breast cancer, (2) sporadic CAS on head and neck (H/N), n = 38, (3) sporadic CAS on trunk/extremities, n = 13, and (4) Stewart–Treves n = 7. Those with trunk/extremity CAS had the highest 5-year OS (64.8 %), with H/N CAS having the worst 5-year OS (21.5 %). On MV analysis, only tumor size <5 cm correlated with improved OS (p = 0.014).

Discussion

In this large series, there appears to be a better overall prognosis than historically reported, especially in Stewart–Treves and CAS on trunk or extremities. While surgery alone was associated with better OS and RFS compared with other treatment modalities, this was not statistically significant. Tumor size was a significant prognostic factor for OS.

Keywords

Overall Survival Axillary Lymph Node Dissection Multifocal Disease Tumor Presentation Chronic Lymphedema 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew C. Perez
    • 1
  • Tapan A. Padhya
    • 2
  • Jane L. Messina
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ryan S. Jackson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ricardo J. Gonzalez
    • 4
    • 5
  • Marilyn M. Bui
    • 3
    • 5
  • G. Douglas Letson
    • 5
  • C. W. Cruse
    • 4
  • Robert S. Lavey
    • 6
  • David Cheong
    • 5
  • Meghan R. Forster
    • 4
  • William J. Fulp
    • 7
  • Vernon K. Sondak
    • 4
    • 5
  • Jonathan S. Zager
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Morsani College of MedicineUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Head and Neck OncologyMoffitt Cancer CenterTampaUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyMoffitt Cancer CenterTampaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Cutaneous OncologyMoffitt Cancer CenterTampaUSA
  5. 5.Department of Sarcoma OncologyMoffitt Cancer CenterTampaUSA
  6. 6.Department of Radiation OncologyMoffitt Cancer CenterTampaUSA
  7. 7.Department of BiostatisticsMoffitt Cancer CenterTampaUSA

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