Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 20, Issue 12, pp 3999–4007 | Cite as

Chemoradiotherapy Before and After Surgery for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

  • Julian C. Hong
  • James D. Murphy
  • Samuel J. Wang
  • Albert C. Koong
  • Daniel T. Chang
Thoracic Oncology

Abstract

Purpose

The optimal combination and timing of therapy for esophageal cancer remains controversial. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare registry was used to assess neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy.

Methods

Patients diagnosed with nonmetastatic T3+ or N1+ esophageal adenocarcinoma (ACA) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from 1995 to 2002 who underwent surgical resection within 6 months of diagnosis were studied. Medicare data defined preoperative chemoradiotherapy (preCRT), preoperative radiotherapy (preRT), postoperative CRT (postCRT), chemotherapy and surgery (CT + S), and surgery alone.

Results

Of 419 eligible patients, 126 received preCRT, 55 preRT, 40 postCRT, 29 CT + S, and 169 surgery alone. PreCRT yielded median overall survival (OS) of 37 months, greater than surgery alone (17 months, p = 0.002) and postCRT (17 months, p = 0.06). PreRT (20 months, p = 0.20), postCRT (p = 0.88), and CT + S (20 months, p = 0.42) were not associated with OS benefit versus surgery alone. For SCC, preCRT improved survival versus surgery alone (p = 0.01), with a trend for ACA (p = 0.07). ACA (22 months) had greater OS than SCC (17 months) (p = 0.03). ACA, younger age, and married status were associated with increased OS. Adjusting for these, preCRT had longer OS versus surgery alone (p = 0.02) and postCRT (p = 0.03). Chemotherapy agents and surgical approach did not affect OS.

Conclusions

In the SEER-Medicare cohort, preCRT significantly improved survival versus surgery alone and postCRT for locally advanced esophageal cancer, particularly for SCC. PreRT, postCRT, and CT + S were not associated with longer survival.

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julian C. Hong
    • 1
    • 2
  • James D. Murphy
    • 1
    • 3
  • Samuel J. Wang
    • 4
  • Albert C. Koong
    • 1
  • Daniel T. Chang
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyStanford University and Cancer CenterStanfordUSA
  2. 2.University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public HealthMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied SciencesUniversity of California San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  4. 4.Department of Radiation MedicineOregon Health and Science UniversityPortlandUSA

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