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Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 18, Issue 10, pp 2873–2878 | Cite as

Ductal Carcinoma-In-Situ of the Breast with Subsequent Distant Metastasis and Death

  • Robert E. Roses
  • Banu K. Arun
  • Sara A. Lari
  • Elizabeth A. Mittendorf
  • Anthony Lucci
  • Kelly K. Hunt
  • Henry M. KuererEmail author
Breast Oncology

Abstract

Background

The rare patient diagnosed with pure ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) develops distant breast cancer metastases (DM). We sought to identify clinical and pathologic predictors of DM.

Methods

The clinical and pathologic characteristics of patients with DM after a diagnosis of pure DCIS from 1996 to 2009 were analyzed.

Results

Twenty five patients with DM after an initial diagnosis of DCIS were identified; 3 were treated at our institution and 22 were originally treated elsewhere. The rate of DM was 0.14% among 2,123 patients originally treated at our institution. Among all patients with DM, 73.7% had DCIS with necrosis, and 62% had DCIS that did not express estrogen receptor. Twenty-four percent of patients with DM were African American, compared to 11.5% of the total study population. The median time from DCIS to DM was 4.5 years. Sixteen patients (66%) had a preceding or simultaneous invasive locoregional recurrence (LRR); nine (34%) did not. At last follow-up, 14 patients (56%) had died of disease; median time to death was 2.4 years. No dominant variables could be identified in patients who developed DM with or without a LRR.

Conclusions

DM after a diagnosis of pure DCIS is rare. Although most patients with DM have a preceding invasive LRR, some present with subsequent DM alone. Further study is required to identify clinical and pathologic predictors of this more rapid disease progression.

Keywords

Tamoxifen Sentinel Node Invasive Breast Cancer Total Mastectomy Partial Mastectomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center is supported in part by the National Institutes of Health through support grant CA016672.

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. Roses
    • 1
  • Banu K. Arun
    • 2
  • Sara A. Lari
    • 1
  • Elizabeth A. Mittendorf
    • 1
  • Anthony Lucci
    • 1
  • Kelly K. Hunt
    • 1
  • Henry M. Kuerer
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Surgical OncologyThe University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medical OncologyThe University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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