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Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 17, Issue 10, pp 2608–2618 | Cite as

Polymorphisms in Apoptosis-Related Genes and Survival of Patients with Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

  • Eung Bae Lee
  • Hyo-Sung Jeon
  • Seung Soo Yoo
  • Yi Young Choi
  • Hyo-Gyoung Kang
  • Sukki Cho
  • Sung-Ick Cha
  • Jin Eun Choi
  • Tae-In Park
  • Byung-Heon Lee
  • Rang-Woon Park
  • In-San Kim
  • Young Mo Kang
  • Chang Ho Kim
  • Sanghoon Jheon
  • Tae Hoon Jung
  • Jae Yong ParkEmail author
Translational Research and Biomarkers

Abstract

Purpose

This study was conducted to determine the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in apoptosis-related genes and survival outcomes of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Methods

Three hundred ten consecutive patients with surgically resected NSCLC were enrolled. Twenty-five SNPs in 17 apoptosis-related genes were genotyped by a sequenome mass spectrometry-based genotyping assay. The genotype associations with overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed.

Results

Three SNPs (TNFRSF10B rs1047266, TNFRSF1A rs4149570, and PPP1R13L rs1005165) were significantly associated with survival outcomes on multivariate analysis. When the three SNPs were combined, OS and DFS were decreased as the number of bad genotypes increased (P trend for OS and DFS = 7 × 10−5 and 1 × 10−4, respectively). Patients with one bad genotype, and patients with two or three bad genotypes had significantly worse OS and DFS compared with those with no bad genotypes [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for OS = 2.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22–4.21, P = 0.01, aHR for DFS = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.08–2.81, P = 0.02; aHR for OS = 4.11, 95% CI = 2.03–8.29, P = 8 × 10−5; and aHR for DFS = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.64–5.11, P = 3 × 10−4, respectively].

Conclusion

Three SNPs in apoptosis-related genes were identified as possible prognostic markers of survival in patients with early-stage NSCLC. The SNPs, and particularly their combined genotypes, can be used to identify patients at high risk for poor disease outcome.

Keywords

Overall Survival Survival Outcome Polymerase Chain Reaction Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Resected NSCLC Poor Survival Outcome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

This study was supported by the National R&D Program for Cancer Control Ministry of Health & Welfare (0720550-2) and the Regional Technology Innovation Program of the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Energy (RTI04-01-01) of Republic of Korea.

Disclosures

The authors indicated no commercial interest.

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Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eung Bae Lee
    • 1
  • Hyo-Sung Jeon
    • 2
  • Seung Soo Yoo
    • 3
  • Yi Young Choi
    • 4
  • Hyo-Gyoung Kang
    • 4
  • Sukki Cho
    • 1
  • Sung-Ick Cha
    • 3
  • Jin Eun Choi
    • 4
  • Tae-In Park
    • 5
  • Byung-Heon Lee
    • 4
  • Rang-Woon Park
    • 4
  • In-San Kim
    • 4
  • Young Mo Kang
    • 3
  • Chang Ho Kim
    • 3
  • Sanghoon Jheon
    • 6
  • Tae Hoon Jung
    • 3
  • Jae Yong Park
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Thoracic SurgeryKyungpook National University HospitalDaeguKorea
  2. 2.Cancer Research CenterKyungpook National University HospitalDaeguKorea
  3. 3.Department of Internal MedicineKyungpook National University HospitalDaeguKorea
  4. 4.Department of Biochemistry and Cell BiologyKyungpook National University HospitalDaeguKorea
  5. 5.Department of PathologyKyungpook National University HospitalDaeguKorea
  6. 6.Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular SurgerySeoul National University School of MedicineSeoulKorea

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