Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 10, Issue 8, pp 863–869 | Cite as

Intraperitoneal Chemohyperthermia Using a Closed Abdominal Procedure and Cytoreductive Surgery for the Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis: Morbidity and Mortality Analysis of 216 Consecutive Procedures

  • O. Glehen
  • D. Osinsky
  • E. Cotte
  • F. Kwiatkowski
  • G. Freyer
  • S. Isaac
  • V. Trillet-Lenoir
  • A. C. Sayag-Beaujard
  • Y. François
  • J. Vignal
  • F. N. Gilly
Original Articles

Abstract

Background: Peritoneal carcinomatosis has been regarded as a lethal clinical entity. Recently, aggressive treatments combining intraperitoneal chemohyperthermia (IPCH) with cytoreductive surgery have resulted in long-term survival in selected patients. The aim of this trial was to analyze the mortality and morbidity of 216 consecutive treatments of peritoneal carcinomatosis by IPCH by using a closed abdominal procedure combined with cytoreductive surgery.

Methods: Between February 1989 and August 2001, 207 patients who underwent 216 IPCH procedures using a closed abdominal procedure with mitomycin C, cisplatin, or both were prospectively studied.

Results: The postoperative mortality and morbidity rates were 3.2% and 24.5%, respectively. The most frequent complications were digestive fistula (6.5%) and hematological toxicity (4.6%). Morbidity was statistically linked with the carcinomatosis stage (P = .016), the duration of surgery (P = .005), and the number of resections and peritonectomy procedures (P = .042). Duration of surgery and carcinomatosis stage were the most common predictors of morbidity.

Conclusions: The frequency of complications after IPCH and cytoreductive surgery was mainly associated with the carcinomatosis stage and the extent of the surgical procedure. The IPCH closed abdominal procedure has shown an acceptable frequency of adverse events.

Key Words

Morbidity Mortality Cytoreductive surgery Hyperthermia Intraperitoneal chemotherapy 

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Copyright information

© The Society of Surgical Oncology, Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Glehen
    • 1
    • 5
  • D. Osinsky
    • 1
  • E. Cotte
    • 1
  • F. Kwiatkowski
    • 6
  • G. Freyer
    • 2
  • S. Isaac
    • 4
  • V. Trillet-Lenoir
    • 2
  • A. C. Sayag-Beaujard
    • 3
  • Y. François
    • 1
  • J. Vignal
    • 1
  • F. N. Gilly
    • 1
    • 5
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryCentre Hospitalier Lyon-SudPierre Bénite CédexFrance
  2. 2.Department of OncologyCentre Hospitalier Lyon-SudPierre Bénite CédexFrance
  3. 3.Department of AnaesthesiologyCentre Hospitalier Lyon-SudPierre Bénite CédexFrance
  4. 4.Department of PathologyCentre Hospitalier Lyon-SudPierre Bénite CédexFrance
  5. 5.Oncologic Hyperthermia Laboratory-Equipe Accueil “Ciblage Thérapeutique en Oncologie”Université Claude Bernard Lyon-1OullinsFrance
  6. 6.Bio-Statistical UnitCentre Jean PerrinClermont-FerrandFrance
  7. 7.Surgical DepartmentCentre Hospitalo-Universitaire Lyon SudPierre Bénite CedexFrance

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