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Robustness of Controlled Release Tablets Based on a Cross-linked Pregelatinized Potato Starch Matrix

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of a cross-linked pregelatinized potato starch (PREGEFLO® PI10) as matrix former for controlled release tablets. Different types of tablets loaded with diprophylline, diltiazem HCl or theophylline were prepared by direct compression of binary drug/polymer blends. The drug content was varied from 20 to 50%. Two hydroxypropyl methylcellulose grades (HPMC K100LV and K100M) were studied as alternative matrix formers. Drug release was measured in a variety of release media using different types of experimental set-ups. This includes 0.1 N HCl, phosphate buffer pH 6.8 and water, optionally containing different amounts of NaCl, sucrose, ethanol or pancreatin, fasted state simulated gastric fluid, fed state simulated gastric fluid, fasted state simulated intestinal fluid, fed state simulated intestinal fluid as well as media simulating the conditions in the colon of healthy subjects and patients suffering from Crohn’s disease. The USP apparatuses I/II/III were used under a range of operating conditions and optionally coupled with the simulation of additional mechanical stress. Importantly, the drug release kinetics was not substantially affected by the investigated environmental conditions from tablets based on the cross-linked pregelatinized potato starch, similar to HPMC tablets. However, in contrast to the latter, the starch-based tablets roughly kept their shape upon exposure to the release media (they “only” increased in size) during the observation period, and the water penetration into the systems was much less pronounced. Thus, the investigated cross-linked pregelatinized potato starch offers an interesting potential as matrix former in controlled release tablets.

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Funding

This project has received funding from the Interreg 2 Seas programme 2014-2020, co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund under subsidy contract 2S01-059_IMODE.

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Correspondence to Juergen Siepmann.

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Several co-authors of this article are employees of the company Roquette, commercializing the investigated starch derivative.

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Elgaied-Lamouchi, D., Descamps, N., Lefèvre, P. et al. Robustness of Controlled Release Tablets Based on a Cross-linked Pregelatinized Potato Starch Matrix. AAPS PharmSciTech 21, 148 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1208/s12249-020-01674-4

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