Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 32, Issue 1, pp 68–76 | Cite as

Leisure time physical activity in relation to depressive symptoms in the black women’s health study

  • Lauren A. Wise
  • Lucile L. Adams-Campbell
  • Julie R. Palmer
  • Lynn Rosenberg
Article

Abstract

Background: A growing body of evidence suggests that physical activity might reduce the risk of depressive symptoms, but there are limited data on Black women.Purpose: The objective was to evaluate the association between leisure time physical activity and depressive symptoms in U.S. Black women.Methods: Participants included 35,224 women ages 21 to 69 from the BlackWomen’s Health Study, a follow-up study of African American women in which data are collected biennially by mail questionnaire.Women answered questions on past and current exercise levels at baseline (1995) and follow-up (1997). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to measure depressive symptoms in 1999. Women who reported a diagnosis of depression before 1999 were excluded. We used multivariate logistic regression models to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for physical activity in relation to depressive symptoms (CES-D score <= 16) with control for potential confounders.Results: Adult vigorous physical activity was inversely associated with depressive symptoms. Women who reported vigorous exercise both in high school (<= 5 hr per week) and adulthood (<= 2 hr per week) had the lowest odds of depressive symptoms (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.71−0.82) relative to never active women; the OR was 0.90 for women who were active in high school but not adulthood (95% CI = 0.85-0.96) and 0.83 for women who were inactive in high school but became active in adulthood (95% CI = 0.77-0.91). Although walking for exercise was not associated with risk of depressive symptoms overall, there was evidence of a weak inverse relation among obese women (Body Mass Index <= 30).Conclusions: Leisure time vigorous physical activity was associated with a reduced odds of depressive symptoms in U.S. Black women.

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Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lauren A. Wise
    • 1
  • Lucile L. Adams-Campbell
    • 2
  • Julie R. Palmer
    • 1
  • Lynn Rosenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Slone Epidemiology Center Boston University School of Public HealthUSA
  2. 2.Cancer Prevention, Control, and Population Sciences Howard University Cancer CenterUSA

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