Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 31, Issue 2, pp 165–172

Pain and wound healing in surgical patients

  • Lynanne McGuire
  • Kathi Heffner
  • Ronald Glaser
  • Bradley Needleman
  • William Malarkey
  • Stephanie Dickinson
  • Stanley Lemeshow
  • Charles Cook
  • Peter Muscarella
  • William Scott Melvin
  • Edwin Christopher Ellison
  • Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser
Article

DOI: 10.1207/s15324796abm3102_8

Cite this article as:
McGuire, L., Heffner, K., Glaser, R. et al. ann. behav. med. (2006) 31: 165. doi:10.1207/s15324796abm3102_8

Abstract

Background: Human and animal laboratory studies have shown that stress delays healing of standardized punch biopsy wounds.Purpose: This 5-week prospective study of 17 women who underwent elective gastric bypass surgery addressed the association between postsurgical pain intensity and subsequent healing of a standard 2.0-mm punch biopsy wound.Methods: Participants were assessed 1 week before surgery, within 3 hr before surgery, 1 to 3 days postsurgery, and at weekly intervals for 4 weeks following surgery.Results: Patient ratings of greater acute postsurgical pain, averaged over Days 1 and 2 postsurgery, and greater persistent postsurgical pain, averaged over 4 weekly postsurgery pain ratings, were significantly associated with subsequent delayed healing of the punch biopsy wound. Presence of depressive symptoms on the day of surgery, pre-existing persistent pain, and medical complications following initial discharge from the hospital were not related to wound healing. Depressive symptoms on the day of surgery and pre-existing persistent pain did predict persistent postsurgical pain intensity.Conclusions: These findings extend the previous laboratory models of wound healing to a surgical population, providing the first evidence that pain plays an important role in postsurgery wound healing, a key variable in postsurgical recovery.

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynanne McGuire
    • 1
  • Kathi Heffner
    • 2
  • Ronald Glaser
    • 3
  • Bradley Needleman
    • 3
  • William Malarkey
    • 3
  • Stephanie Dickinson
    • 3
  • Stanley Lemeshow
    • 3
  • Charles Cook
    • 3
  • Peter Muscarella
    • 3
  • William Scott Melvin
    • 3
  • Edwin Christopher Ellison
    • 3
  • Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser
    • 3
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentUniversity of Maryland Baltimore CountyBaltimore
  2. 2.Ohio UniversityUSA
  3. 3.The Ohio State UniversityUSA

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