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Self-efficacy effects on feeling states in women

  • Gerald J. Jerome
  • David X. Marquez
  • Edward McAuley
  • Steriani Canaklisova
  • Erin Snook
  • Melissa Vickers
Article

Abstract

In this study, exercise self-efficacy was manipulated in a laboratory setting and its effects on feeling state responses were examined. A sample consisting largely of Non-Latina White and Latina women (N = 59) were randomly assigned to a low- or high-efficacy condition, and efficacy was manipulated by provision of false feedback and computer data. Feeling state responses were assessed before and after exercise. Efficacy was successfully manipulated, and participants in the high-efficacy condition reported more positive well-being and energy and less psychological distress and fatigue than those in the low-efficacy condition. There wereno significant differences between the two ethnic groups for self-efficacy and feeling state responses. In addition, no clear pattern of relations emerged between efficacy and feeling state responses. The results support structuring exercise treatments in such a way that mastery experiences and positive feedback are maximized to enhance self-efficacy and improve subjective experiences.

Key words

exercise self-efficacy feeling states affect 

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Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald J. Jerome
    • 1
  • David X. Marquez
    • 1
  • Edward McAuley
    • 1
  • Steriani Canaklisova
    • 1
  • Erin Snook
    • 1
  • Melissa Vickers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of KinesiologyUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

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