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Molecular Autism

, 10:37 | Cite as

Correction to: Mechanisms underlying the EEG biomarker in Dup15q syndrome

  • Joel FrohlichEmail author
  • Lawrence T. Reiter
  • Vidya Saravanapandian
  • Charlotte DiStefano
  • Scott Huberty
  • Carly Hyde
  • Stormy Chamberlain
  • Carrie E. Bearden
  • Peyman Golshani
  • Andrei Irimia
  • Richard W. Olsen
  • Joerg F. Hipp
  • Shafali S. Jeste
Open Access
Correction

Correction to: Mol Autism (2019) 10:29

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13229-019-0280-6

Following publication of the original article [1], we have been notified that the Ethics statement of the articles should be changed. The Ethics statement now reads:

All EEG studies and analyses were performed with institutional review board (IRB) and/or National Research Ethics Service approval.

The Ethics statement should read:

The EEG data collected for subject 801–015 was collected at University of Tennessee Health Science Centre (UTHSC) under an IRB approved protocol with informed consent, the transfer of this EEG data to University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) for analysis was not approved by the UTHSC IRB. The data transfer was approved by the UCLA IRB with the understanding that the data file was de-identified, however, patient identifiers were included on the EEG disk in error. The EEG data for this subject are now stored on the UCLA server fully de-identified. All other subjects were collected at UCLA under an IRB approved protocol. The data and results presented in this article remain unaffected, and this correction has been published at the request of the Research Integrity Officer at UTHSC.

The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Economic & Social Research Council (award ES/P009255/1, Sustainable Care: connecting people and systems, 2017–21, Principal Investigator Sue Yeandle, University of Sheffield). Prof Mark Hawley is a Theme Lead for the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Devices for Dignity MedTech Co-operative (MIC). The work of the Devices for Dignity MIC is funded by the NIHR. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care.

Reference

  1. 1.
    Frohlich J, et al. Mechanisms underlying the EEG biomarker in Dup15q syndrome. Mol Autism. 2019;10:29.  https://doi.org/10.1186/s13229-019-0280-6.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s). 2019

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joel Frohlich
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Lawrence T. Reiter
    • 4
  • Vidya Saravanapandian
    • 2
  • Charlotte DiStefano
    • 2
  • Scott Huberty
    • 2
    • 5
  • Carly Hyde
    • 2
  • Stormy Chamberlain
    • 6
  • Carrie E. Bearden
    • 7
  • Peyman Golshani
    • 8
  • Andrei Irimia
    • 9
  • Richard W. Olsen
    • 10
  • Joerg F. Hipp
    • 1
  • Shafali S. Jeste
    • 2
  1. 1.Roche Pharma Research and Early Development, Neuroscience, Ophthalmology and Rare Diseases, Roche Innovation Center BaselBaselSwitzerland
  2. 2.Center for Autism Research and TreatmentUniversity of California Los Angeles, Semel Institute for NeuroscienceLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of California Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Departments of Neurology, Pediatrics and Anatomy & NeurobiologyThe University of Tennessee Health Science CenterMemphisUSA
  5. 5.McGill University, MUHC Research InstituteMontrealCanada
  6. 6.Genetics and Genome Sciences, UConn HealthFarmingtonUSA
  7. 7.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and Department of PsychologyUniversity of California Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  8. 8.Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, David Geffen School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  9. 9.Leonard Davis School of GerontologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  10. 10.Department of Molecular and Medical PharmacologyDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLALos AngelesUSA

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