Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 128–137 | Cite as

Cultivating service brand equity

  • Leonard L. Berry
Article

Abstract

In packaged goods, the product is the primary brand. However, with services, the company is the primary brand. This article, based on primary research with 14 mature, high-performance service companies, makes a case for service branding as a cornerstone of services marketing for today and tomorrow. The article presents a service-branding model that underscores the salient role of customers' service experiences in brand formation. Four primary strategies that excellent service firms use to cultivate brand equity are discussed and illustrated. Branding is not just for tangible goods; it is a principal success driver for service organizations as well.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aaker, David A. 1996.Building Strong Brands. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  2. Beers, Charlotte. 1998. “Building Brands Worthy of Devotion.”Leader to Leader 11 (Winter): 39–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Berry, Leonard L. 1999.Discovering the Soul of Service: The Nine Drivers of Sustainable Business Success. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  4. — and A. Parasuraman. 1991.Marketing Services: Competing Through Quality. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  5. Gilly, Mary C. and Mary Wolfinbarger. 1998. “Advertising's Internal Audience.”Journal of Marketing 62 (January): 69–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Gordon, Seth. 1998. “Permission Marketing.”Fast Company 14 (April–May): 198–212.Google Scholar
  7. Hudler, Donald W. 1996. “Leadership With Enthusiasm.” A speech at Texas A&M University's Center for Retailing Studies Fall Symposium, Dallas, October 17.Google Scholar
  8. Keller, Kevin Lane. 1993. “Conceptualization, Measuring, and Managing Customer-Based Brand Equity.”Journal of Marketing 57 (January): 1–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Peters, Tom. 1997.The Circle of Innovation. New York: Knopf.Google Scholar
  10. Richards, Stan. 1998. “Building a Brand.” A speech at Texas A&M University's Center for Retailing Studies Fall Symposium, Dallas, October 8.Google Scholar
  11. Schultz, Howard. 1997.Pour Your Heart Into It. New York: Hyperion.Google Scholar
  12. Storch, Jerry. 1998. “Building a Brand at Target Stores.” A speech at Texas A&M University's Center for Retailing Studies Fall Symposium, Dallas, October 8.Google Scholar
  13. “Strategic Lessons From the World's Best Brands.” 1998.Leader to Leader 10 (Fall): 54–56.Google Scholar
  14. Thurow, Roger. 1998. “A Sports Icon Regains Its Footing by Using the Moves of the Past.”Wall Street Journal, January 21, pp. A1 and A8.Google Scholar
  15. Webber, Alan M. 1997. “What Great Brands Do—An Interview of Scott Bedbury.”Fast Company 10 (August–September): 96–100.Google Scholar
  16. Zeithaml, Valarie A. 1981. “How Consumer Evaluation Processes Differ Between Goods and Services.” InMarketing of Services. Eds. James H. Donnelly and William R. George. Chicago: American Marketing Association, 186–189.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Academy of Marketing Science 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard L. Berry
    • 1
  1. 1.Texas A&M UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations