Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 249–251 | Cite as

Implementation of Problem-Based Learning in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: Shared Experiences of a Special-Interest Study Group

  • Norbert Skokauskas
  • Anthony P.S. Guerrero
  • Mark D. Hanson
  • Xavier Coll
  • Moli Paul
  • Peter Szatmari
  • Susan M.K. Tan
  • Cathy K. Bell
  • Jeffrey Hunt
Brief Reports

Abstract

Background/Objective

Problem-based learning (PBL) represents a major development and change in educational practice that continues to have a large impact across subjects and disciplines worldwide. It would seem that child and adolescent psychiatry, because of its inherently integrative, bio-psycho-social nature and emphasis on teamwork and collaboration, would be a specialty learned optimally through PBL. Thus, there was a need to establish an international group where experiences in implementing PBL in child and adolescent psychiatry could be shared. This article reports on the first meeting and plans of the Problem-Based Learning in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) Special Interest Study Group (SISG), held at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Methods

Through international collaboration and information-sharing, the SISG aims to promote knowledge among Childand Adolescent Psychiatrists on PBL, to explore evaluation methods of PBL in CAP, and to discuss development of PBL-based curricula.

Results

Problem-based learning (PBL) represents a major change in education that has had a large impact across disciplines worldwide.

Conclusion

The core steps in PBL are the following: presentation of the initial problem; discussion of the problem, and development of learning objectives; independent learning focused on the objectives; and discussion, exploration of new ideas, and discovery of solutions in the reconvened group. Different from the traditional teacher’s role, the PBL tutor is an active facilitator who guides learners to identify issues and ways to learn, rather than a “content expert” who provides facts.

Keywords

Academic Psychiatry Adolescent Psychiatry Adolescent Psychiatrist Active Facilitator Guide Learner 

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norbert Skokauskas
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Anthony P.S. Guerrero
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Mark D. Hanson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Xavier Coll
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Moli Paul
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Peter Szatmari
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Susan M.K. Tan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Cathy K. Bell
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Jeffrey Hunt
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryTrinity CollegeDublinIreland
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of HawaiiIreland
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of TorontoCanada
  4. 4.University of East AngliaNorwichUK
  5. 5.The University of WarwickUK
  6. 6.Offord Centre For Child Studies, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural NeurosciencesMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  7. 7.Department of PsychiatryUniversity KebangsaanMalaysia
  8. 8.Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidence

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