Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 35, Issue 4, pp 232–237 | Cite as

Web-Based Simulation in Psychiatry Residency Training: A Pilot Study

  • Tristan Gorrindo
  • Lee Baer
  • Kathy M. Sanders
  • Robert J. Birnbaum
  • John A. Fromson
  • Kelly M. Sutton-Skinner
  • Sarah A. Romeo
  • Eugene V. Beresin
Original Articles

Abstract

Background

Medical specialties, including surgery, obstetrics, anesthesia, critical care, and trauma, have adopted simulation technology for measuring clinical competency as a routine part of their residency training programs; yet, simulation technologies have rarely been adapted or used for psychiatry training.

Objective

The authors describe the development of a web-based computer simulation tool intended to assess physician competence in obtaining informed consent before prescribing antipsychotic medication to a simulated patient with symptoms of psychosis.

Method

Eighteen residents participated in a pilot study of the Computer Simulation Assessment Tool (CSAT). Outcome measures included physician performance on required elements, pre- and post-test measures of physician confidence in obtaining informed consent, and levels of system usability.

Results

Data suggested that the CSAT increased physician confidence in obtaining informed consent and that it was easy to use.

Conclusions

The CSAT was an effective educational tool in simulating patient—physician interactions, and it may serve as a model for use of other web-based simulations to augment traditional teaching methods in residency education.

Keywords

Psychotropic Medication Antipsychotic Medication Academic Psychiatry Virtual Patient Residency Training Program 

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tristan Gorrindo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Lee Baer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kathy M. Sanders
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Robert J. Birnbaum
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • John A. Fromson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kelly M. Sutton-Skinner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Sarah A. Romeo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Eugene V. Beresin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Dept. of PsychiatryMassachusetts General HospitalBoston
  2. 2.Dept. of PsychiatryHarvard Medical SchoolBoston
  3. 3.McLean HospitalBelmont

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