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Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 438–445 | Cite as

The Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies (CAMS) Minor at New York University

  • Jess P. Shatkin
  • Harold S. Koplewicz
Original Article

Abstract

Objective

The authors describe the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Studies (CAMS) undergraduate college minor at New York University.

Methods

The authors detail the development, structure, and operation of the CAMS minor. They describe the importance of identifying program goals, building coalitions, creating an advisory board, selecting teaching materials and instructors, and establishing a viable financial model.

Results

The authors present student evaluations from the first course, which demonstrate great satisfaction with the program.

Conclusion

The successful development of the CAMS minor demonstrates that Schools of Medicine (more specifically, the departments of Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry) can have a positive impact on undergraduate student education, which may later translate into an increased number of students who consider entering medical school and child psychiatry.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Eating Disorder Academic Psychiatry Adolescent Psychiatry Adolescent Mental Health 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Child Study CenterNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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