Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 141–154 | Cite as

Alternate Methods of Teaching Psychopharmacology

  • Sidney Zisook
  • Sheldon Benjamin
  • Richard Balon
  • Ira Glick
  • Alan Louie
  • Christine Moutier
  • Trenton Moyer
  • Cynthia Santos
  • Mark Servis
Perspective

Abstract

Objective

This article reviews methods used to teach psychopharmacology to psychiatry residents that utilize principles of adult learning, enlist active participation of residents, and provide faculty with skills to seek, analyze, and use new information over the course of their careers.

Methods

The pros and cons of five “nonlecture” methods of teaching are reviewed: 1) journal clubs, 2) problem-based learning, 3) formalized patient-centered training, 4) games, and 5) the use of modern technology.

Results

Several programs are beginning to find novel methods of teaching psychopharmacology that are effective and well received by trainees and faculty.

Conclusion

Programs need to go beyond the traditional lecture and apprenticeship model of psychopharmacology education to help make learning more fun, useful, relevant and self-sustaining.

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sidney Zisook
    • 1
  • Sheldon Benjamin
    • 2
  • Richard Balon
    • 3
  • Ira Glick
    • 4
  • Alan Louie
    • 5
  • Christine Moutier
    • 1
  • Trenton Moyer
    • 1
  • Cynthia Santos
    • 6
  • Mark Servis
    • 7
  1. 1.San Diego School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLa JollaUSA
  2. 2.University of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA
  3. 3.School of MedicineWayne State UniversityDetroitUSA
  4. 4.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  5. 5.San Francisco School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  6. 6.University of Texas Medical SchoolHoustonUSA
  7. 7.Davis School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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