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Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 337–343 | Cite as

History of Women in Psychiatry

  • Laura D. Hirshbein
Perspective

Keywords

Academic Psychiatry Early 20th Century Academic Medicine Woman Patient Teaching Role 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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