Advertisement

Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp 165–170 | Cite as

Web-Streamed Didactic Instruction on Substance Use Disorders Compares Favorably With Live-Lecture Format

  • Karam-Hage Maher
  • Kirk J. Brower M.D
  • Patricia B. Mullan
  • Tamara Gay
  • Larry D. Gruppen
Original Article

Abstract

Objective

Education about substance use disorders in medical schools and, subsequently, physicians’ identification of and intervention in these diagnoses lag behind that of most other disabling disorders. To reduce barriers and improve access to education about this major public health concern, medical schools are increasingly adopting web-based instruction on substance use and other psychiatric disorders as part of their curricula; however, it is not well known how a web-streamed lecture compares with a traditional one. The authors hypothesized that both these formats would be equally efficacious in terms of knowledge acquisition and student satisfaction.

Methods

Authors conducted a prospective study to test this hypothesis among third-year medical students who received web-streamed lecture on substance use/addiction versus those who received a traditional live lecture.

Results

Of the 243 students, significantly more students completed the on-line lecture series. Of the 216 students in the final study sample, 130 (60%) were assigned to the web-streamed lecture and 86 (40%) to the live lecture. Within-subject comparisons of pre- and post-lecture scores for the entire cohort indicated a significant improvement in the percentage of correct answers (21.0% difference). Although no differences in improved scores between the two groups were found, students in the live-lecture group reported small, but significantly higher levels of satisfaction.

Conclusions

This preliminary work supports the hypothesis that a web-streamed lecture can be at least equally efficacious as a traditional lecture in terms of knowledge acquisition. However, attention needs to be paid to the lower satisfaction levels associated with using the web-streamed format.

Keywords

Knowledge Acquisition Academic Psychiatry Acad Psychiatry Psychiatry Clerkship Lecture Format 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Gore FM, Bloem PJ, Patton GC, et al: Global burden of disease in young people aged 10–24 years: a systematic analysis. Lancet 2011; 377:2093–2102PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    McLellan AT, Lewis DC, O’Brien CP, et al: Drug dependence, a chronic medical illness: implications for treatment, insurance, and outcomes evaluation. JAMA 2000; 284:1689–1695PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    el-Guebaly N, Toews J, Lockyer J, et al: Medical education in substance-related disorders: components and outcome. Addiction 2000; 95:949–957PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Calvert SH, Sharpe M, Power M, et al: Does undergraduate education have an effect on Edinburgh medical students’ attitudes to psychiatry and psychiatric patients? J Nerv Ment Dis 1999; 187:757–761PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bennet AJ, Arnold L: M. Use of a computerized evaluation system in a psychiatry clerkship. Acad Psychiatry 2004; 28:197–203CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Krain LP: “It’s high-tech, but is it better?”: applications of technology in psychiatry education. Acad Psychiatry 2007; 31:40–49PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Robb N: Teaching on addiction issues lacking in medical school, specialists told. CMAJ 1998; 158:640–641PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Goerg D, De Saussure C, Guimón J: Objectives for the undergraduate teaching of psychiatry: survey of doctors and students. Med Educ 1999; 33:639–647PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Christison GW, Haviland MG: Requiring a one-week addiction treatment experience in a six-week psychiatry clerkship: effects on attitudes toward substance-abusing patients. Teach Learn Med 2003; 15:93–97CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Dixon RP, Roberts LM, Lawrie S, et al: Medical students’ attitudes to psychiatric illness in primary care. Med Educ 2008; 42:1080–1087PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Leist JC, Kristofco RE: The changing paradigm for continuing medical education: impact of information on the teachable moment. Bull Med Libr Assoc 1990; 78:173–179PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Siegal HA, Cole PA, Li L, et al: Can a brief clinical practicum influence physicians’ communications with patients about alcohol and drug problems? results of a long-term follow-up. Teach Learn Med 2000; 12:72–77PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Martin VL, Bennett DS: Creation of a web-based lecture series for psychiatry clerkship students: initial findings. Acad Psychiatry 2004; 28:209–214PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karam-Hage Maher
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kirk J. Brower M.D
    • 1
    • 2
  • Patricia B. Mullan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tamara Gay
    • 1
    • 2
  • Larry D. Gruppen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept of Psychiatry and Behavioral ScienceUniversity of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHouston
  2. 2.Depts. of Psychiatry and Dept. of Medical EducationUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor

Personalised recommendations