The European Physical Journal Special Topics

, Volume 226, Issue 13, pp 2859–2871

Atmospheric pressure plasma accelerates tail regeneration in tadpoles Xenopus laevis

Regular Article
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Technological Applications of Microplasmas

Abstract

Atmospheric pressure plasma is a partially ionized gas composed of neutral and charged particles, including electrons and ions, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, it is utilized as possible therapy in oncology, sterilization, skin diseases, wound healing and tissue regeneration. In this study we focused on effect of plasma exposure on tail regeneration of tadpoles, Xenopus leavis with special emphasis on role of ROS, antioxidant defenses and morphological features of the regenerate. When amputated region of the tail was exposed to the helium plasma it resulted in a faster rate of growth, elevated ROS and increase in antioxidant enzymes in the regenerate compared to that of untreated control. An increase in nitric oxide (free radical) as well as activity of nitric oxide synthase(s) were observed once the cells of the regeneration blastema – a mass of proliferating cells are ready for differentiation. Microscopically the cells of the regenerate of plasma treated tadpoles show altered morphology and characteristics of cellular hypoxia and oxidative stress. We summarize that plasma exposure accelerates the dynamics of wound healing and tail regeneration through its effects on cell proliferation and differentiation as well as angiogenesis mediated through ROS signaling.

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Copyright information

© EDP Sciences and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of BiologyWilliam Paterson UniversityWayneUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsWilliam Paterson UniversityWayneUSA

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