The European Physical Journal D

, Volume 58, Issue 1, pp 1–22

Quantum memories

A review based on the European integrated project “Qubit Applications (QAP)”
  • C. Simon
  • M. Afzelius
  • J. Appel
  • A. Boyer de la Giroday
  • S. J. Dewhurst
  • N. Gisin
  • C. Y. Hu
  • F. Jelezko
  • S. Kröll
  • J. H. Müller
  • J. Nunn
  • E. S. Polzik
  • J. G. Rarity
  • H. De Riedmatten
  • W. Rosenfeld
  • A. J. Shields
  • N. Sköld
  • R. M. Stevenson
  • R. Thew
  • I. A. Walmsley
  • M. C. Weber
  • H. Weinfurter
  • J. Wrachtrup
  • R. J. Young
Colloquium

DOI: 10.1140/epjd/e2010-00103-y

Cite this article as:
Simon, C., Afzelius, M., Appel, J. et al. Eur. Phys. J. D (2010) 58: 1. doi:10.1140/epjd/e2010-00103-y

Abstract

We perform a review of various approaches to the implementation of quantum memories, with an emphasis on activities within the quantum memory sub-project of the EU integrated project “Qubit Applications”. We begin with a brief overview over different applications for quantum memories and different types of quantum memories. We discuss the most important criteria for assessing quantum memory performance and the most important physical requirements. Then we review the different approaches represented in “Qubit Applications” in some detail. They include solid-state atomic ensembles, NV centers, quantum dots, single atoms, atomic gases and optical phonons in diamond. We compare the different approaches using the discussed criteria.

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Copyright information

© EDP Sciences, SIF, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Simon
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Afzelius
    • 1
  • J. Appel
    • 3
  • A. Boyer de la Giroday
    • 4
  • S. J. Dewhurst
    • 4
  • N. Gisin
    • 1
  • C. Y. Hu
    • 5
  • F. Jelezko
    • 6
  • S. Kröll
    • 7
  • J. H. Müller
    • 3
  • J. Nunn
    • 8
  • E. S. Polzik
    • 3
  • J. G. Rarity
    • 5
  • H. De Riedmatten
    • 1
  • W. Rosenfeld
    • 9
    • 10
  • A. J. Shields
    • 4
  • N. Sköld
    • 4
  • R. M. Stevenson
    • 4
  • R. Thew
    • 1
  • I. A. Walmsley
    • 8
  • M. C. Weber
    • 9
    • 10
  • H. Weinfurter
    • 9
    • 10
  • J. Wrachtrup
    • 6
  • R. J. Young
    • 4
  1. 1.Group of Applied Physics, University of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Institute for Quantum Information Science and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  3. 3.Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen UniversityKøbenhavn ØDenmark
  4. 4.Toshiba Research Europe LimitedCambridgeUK
  5. 5.Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of BristolBristolUK
  6. 6.Physikalisches Institut, Universität StuttgartStuttgartGermany
  7. 7.Department of PhysicsLund UniversityLundSweden
  8. 8.Clarendon Laboratory, University of OxfordOxfordUK
  9. 9.Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität MünchenMünchenGermany
  10. 10.Max-Planck-Institut für QuantenoptikGarchingGermany

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