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GIARPS@TNG: GIANO-B and HARPS-N together for a wider wavelength range spectroscopy

  • R. ClaudiEmail author
  • S. Benatti
  • I. Carleo
  • A. Ghedina
  • J. Guerra
  • G. Micela
  • E. Molinari
  • E. Oliva
  • M. Rainer
  • A. Tozzi
  • C. Baffa
  • A. Baruffolo
  • N. Buchschacher
  • Cecconi M.
  • R. Cosentino
  • D. Fantinel
  • L. Fini
  • F. Ghinassi
  • E. Giani
  • E. Gonzalez
  • M. Gonzalez
  • R. Gratton
  • A. Harutyunyan
  • N. Hernandez
  • M. Lodi
  • L. Malavolta
  • J. Maldonado
  • L. Origlia
  • N. Sanna
  • J. Sanjuan
  • S. Scuderi
  • U. Seemann
  • A. Sozzetti
  • H. Perez Ventura
  • M. Hernandez Diaz
  • A. Galli
  • C. Gonzalez
  • L. Riverol
  • C. Riverol
Regular Article
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Focus Point on Highlights of Planetary Science in Italy

Abstract.

Since 2012, thanks to the installation of the high-resolution echelle spectrograph in the optical range HARPS-N, the Italian telescope TNG (La Palma) became one of the key facilities for the study of the extrasolar planets. In 2014 TNG also offered GIANO to the scientific community, providing a near-infrared (NIR) cross-dispersed echelle spectroscopy covering 0.97-2.45μm at a resolution of 50000. GIANO, although designed for direct light-feed from the telescope at the Nasmyth-B focus, was provisionally mounted on the rotating building and connected via fibers to only available interface at the Nasmyth-A focal plane. The synergy between these two instruments is particularly appealing for a wide range of science cases, especially for the search of exoplanets around young and active stars and the characterisation of their atmosphere. Through the funding scheme “WOW” (a Way to Others Worlds), the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) proposed to position GIANO at the focal station for which it was originally designed and the simultaneous use of these spectrographs with the aim to achieve high-resolution spectroscopy in a wide wavelength range (0.383-2.45μm) obtained in a single exposure, giving rise to the project called GIARPS (GIANO-B & HARPS-N). Because of its characteristics, GIARPS can be considered the first and unique worldwide instrument providing not only high resolution in a large wavelength band, but also a high-precision radial velocity measurement both in the visible and in the NIR arm, since in the next future GIANO-B will be equipped with gas absorption cells.

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Copyright information

© Società Italiana di Fisica and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Claudi
    • 1
    Email author
  • S. Benatti
    • 1
  • I. Carleo
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Ghedina
    • 3
  • J. Guerra
    • 3
  • G. Micela
    • 4
  • E. Molinari
    • 3
    • 5
  • E. Oliva
    • 6
  • M. Rainer
    • 7
  • A. Tozzi
    • 6
  • C. Baffa
    • 6
  • A. Baruffolo
    • 1
  • N. Buchschacher
    • 8
  • Cecconi M.
    • 3
  • R. Cosentino
    • 3
  • D. Fantinel
    • 1
  • L. Fini
    • 6
  • F. Ghinassi
    • 3
  • E. Giani
    • 6
  • E. Gonzalez
    • 4
  • M. Gonzalez
    • 3
  • R. Gratton
    • 1
  • A. Harutyunyan
    • 3
  • N. Hernandez
    • 3
  • M. Lodi
    • 3
  • L. Malavolta
    • 2
  • J. Maldonado
    • 4
  • L. Origlia
    • 9
  • N. Sanna
    • 6
  • J. Sanjuan
    • 3
  • S. Scuderi
    • 10
  • U. Seemann
    • 11
  • A. Sozzetti
    • 12
  • H. Perez Ventura
    • 3
  • M. Hernandez Diaz
    • 3
  • A. Galli
    • 3
  • C. Gonzalez
    • 3
  • L. Riverol
    • 3
  • C. Riverol
    • 3
  1. 1.INAF, Astronomical Observatory of PadovaPadovaItaly
  2. 2.Dept. of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of PadovaPadovaItaly
  3. 3.INAF, Fundacion Galileo GalileiBreña BajaSpain
  4. 4.INAF, Astrophysical Observatory of PalermoPalermoItaly
  5. 5.INAF-IASFMilanoItaly
  6. 6.INAF, Astrophysical Observatory of ArcetriArcetriItaly
  7. 7.INAF, Astronomical Observatory of BreraMerateItaly
  8. 8.University of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  9. 9.INAF, Astronomical Observatory of BolognaBolognaItaly
  10. 10.INAF, Astrophysical Observatory of CataniaCataniaItaly
  11. 11.Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Institut für AstrophysikGöttingenGermany
  12. 12.Astrophysical Observatory of TorinoPino TorineseItaly

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