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Galaxy Cluster A 2142: Halo Boundary, “Red Sequence”, Properties of Galaxies Based on SDSS

Abstract—Here we present results of studying the dynamics of galaxies, properties of early-type galaxies, properties of galaxies with the quenched star formation (QGs) in the A 2142 cluster based on the archival data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data (SDSS DR10). We found the observed halo boundary, the “splashback” radius \({{R}_{{{\text{sp}}}}}\), which is equal to 4.12 Mpc (\({{M}_{r}} < - {{20.}^{{\text{m}}}}3\)) and 4.06 Mpc (\({{M}_{r}} < - {{21.}^{{\text{m}}}}5\)) over the integral distribution of the number of galaxies as a function of the squared distance from the center. We have studied how early-type galaxies are distributed in the center and in the outskirts of the cluster (\({R \mathord{\left/ {\vphantom {R {{{R}_{{200}}}}}} \right. \kern-0em} {{{R}_{{200}}}}}\)< 3, \({{M}_{r}} < - {{20.}^{{\text{m}}}}3\)) and plotted the “red sequence” in the form of \((g - r) = ( - 0.024 \pm 0.001){{M}_{r}} + (0.441 \pm 0.005)\). Among all the cluster galaxies, the galaxies with the quenched star formation (\( - 12\) yr\(^{{ - 1}} < \log sSFR < 10.75\) yr\(^{{ - 1}}\)) make up about one third. We have found that the fraction of QGs beyond the “splashback” radius \({{R}_{{{\text{s}}p}}}\) is the same as in the field at the same \(z\) with coordinates of the center of \({\text{16}}{{{\text{.}}}^{{\text{h}}}}{\text{5,}}\,\,31\)° and a size of 300′. For galaxies with the stellar masses \(\log {{{{M}_{*}}} \mathord{\left/ {\vphantom {{{{M}_{*}}} {{{M}_{ \odot }}}}} \right. \kern-0em} {{{M}_{ \odot }}}} = [10.5;11.0]\) (this is the main mass range of QGs), when entering the cluster, there is a decrease in the radii \({{R}_{{90,r}}}\) by about \(30\% \) when moving towards the center.

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Correspondence to F. G. Kopylova.

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Translated by N. Oborina

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Kopylova, F.G., Kopylov, A.I. Galaxy Cluster A 2142: Halo Boundary, “Red Sequence”, Properties of Galaxies Based on SDSS. Astrophys. Bull. 77, 22–30 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1134/S1990341322010059

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1134/S1990341322010059

Keywords:

  • galaxies: clusters: general
  • galaxies: evolution
  • galaxies: star formation
  • galaxies: clusters: individual: A2142