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Neurochemical Journal

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 266–269 | Cite as

The involvement of serotonin and sex hormones in the generation of “killer rats”

  • N. G. AleksidzeEmail author
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  • 72 Downloads

Abstract

An aggressive social environment induces chronic stress, pathological aggression, and the generation of killer rats. During natural or pilocarpine-induced aggression, serotonin content decreases by more than 50%. Aggression also correlates with quantitative alterations in the contents of male sex hormones. Specifically, castration of animals results in a significant attenuation of aggression, whereas injection of the male sex hormone testosterone leads to stimulation of aggressive behavior in rats. Rats that are tired after swimming in a pool exhibited substantially lower aggression. We can conclude that in order to avoid aggressive behavior in teenagers, physical activity should be included in intervals between lessons for neutralization of hormones and other biologically active agents that are directly related to formation of aggressive behavior.

Keywords

serotonin sex hormones murder 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dzhavakhishvili Tbilisi State UniversityTbilisiGeorgia
  2. 2.TbilisiGeorgia

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