Eurasian Soil Science

, Volume 50, Issue 7, pp 791–804

Paleoecological crisis in the steppes of the Lower Volga region in the Middle of the Bronze Age (III–II centuries BC)

  • T. S. Demkina
  • A. V. Borisov
  • V. A. Demkin
  • T. E. Khomutova
  • T. V. Kuznetsova
  • M. V. El’tsov
  • S. N. Udal’tsov
Genesis and Geography of Soils

Abstract

Diagnostic features of a catastrophic aridization of climate, desertification, and paleoecological crisis in steppes of the Lower Volga region have been identified on the basis of data on the morphological, chemical, and microbiological properties of paleosols under archeological monuments (burial mounds) of the Middle Bronze Age. These processes resulted in a certain convergence of the soil cover with transformation of zonal chestnut (Kastanozems) paleosols and paleosolonetzes (Solonetz Humic) into specific chestnut-like eroded saline calcareous paleosols analogous to the modern brown desert-steppe soils (Calcisols Haplic) that predominated in this region 4300–3800 years ago.1 In the second millennium BC, humidization of the climate led to the divergence of the soil cover with secondary formation of the complexes of chestnut soils and solonetzes. This paleoecological crisis had a significant effect on the economy of the tribes in the Late Catacomb and Post-Catacomb time stipulating their higher mobility and transition to the nomadic cattle breeding.

Keywords

paleosols under burial mounds the Middle Bronze Age steppe catastrophic aridization paleoecological crisis the convergence of the soil cover soil microorganisms 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. S. Demkina
    • 1
  • A. V. Borisov
    • 1
  • V. A. Demkin
    • 1
  • T. E. Khomutova
    • 1
  • T. V. Kuznetsova
    • 1
  • M. V. El’tsov
    • 1
  • S. N. Udal’tsov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems of Soil ScienceRussian Academy of SciencesPushchinoRussia

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