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Doklady Earth Sciences

, Volume 476, Issue 1, pp 992–996 | Cite as

Caledonian formation of gold-bearing sulfide depositions in Early Proterozoic gabbroids in the northern Ladoga region

  • Sh. K. Baltybaev
  • G. V. Ovchinnikova
  • V. A. Glebovitskii
  • I. A. Alekseev
  • I. M. Vasil’eva
  • N. G. Risvanova
Geology

Abstract

We have studied Pb isotopic systems of K-feldspar, pyrite, and pyrrhotine from gabbroids and ore of the Velimyaki Early Proterozoic massif in the northern Ladoga region in the southeastern part of the Fennoscandian Shield. The isochronous Pb–Pb age of sulfides has been determined as ∼450 Ma, which corresponds to intersection of the regression line with the lead accumulation curve with μ = 10.4–10.8; the model Pb age of sulfides is close to isochronous under the condition that the composition of lead evolved from a geochemical reservoir with an age of 1.9 Ga. The isotopic parameters of the lead in sulfides and K-feldspar indicate their formation in upper crust conditions (μ = 238U/204Pb > 10). From the obtained data, it follows that the isotopic composition of lead in K-feldspar corresponds to a Proterozoic age (1890 Ma) of magmatic crystallization of the rocks in the massif, and strongly radiogenic lead sulfides testify, with the greatest probability, to the later (Caledonian) formation of sulfide ores.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sh. K. Baltybaev
    • 1
  • G. V. Ovchinnikova
    • 1
  • V. A. Glebovitskii
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. A. Alekseev
    • 2
  • I. M. Vasil’eva
    • 1
  • N. G. Risvanova
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Precambrian Geology and GeochronologyRussian Academy of SciencesSt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.St. Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia

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