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Petroleum Chemistry

, Volume 57, Issue 12, pp 1007–1011 | Cite as

Simple Spectrophotometric Method for Determination of Iron in Crude Oil

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Abstract

In this research article, spectrophotometric method for the determination of iron with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) in two different crude oil samples from different oil fields in the Suez-Gulf region of Egypt has been proposed. The method is efficient, reliable and inexpensive where a cost-effective technique, along with commercially available spectrophotometric reagent, was utilized in this work. The method was based on decomposition of the organic matrix by combustion in a heating muffle furnace at 550°C. The inorganic residue was then dissolved in diluted nitric acid and the iron was reduced to the divalent state. The color was developed by the addition of 1,10-phenanthroline as chelating agent after adjusting the pH of the solution, then the absorbance of the solution was measured at approximately 510 nm after a short reaction period. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) obtained were found to be 0.017 and 0.051 μg/mL, respectively. The effect of interferences was studied and the accuracy of the method was evaluated by recovery experiment, analysis of oil reference material and by comparison of results with those obtained using flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS) after dilution in an organic solvent for sample preparation.

Keywords

spectrophotometry crude oil combustion iron determination 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. B. Shehata
    • 1
  • G. G. Mohamed
    • 2
  • M. A. Gab-Allah
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Standards, Tersa StHaram, GizaEgypt
  2. 2.Chemistry Department, Faculty of ScienceCairo UniversityGizaEgypt

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