Cardiovascular resistance to orthostatic load in athletes after aerobic exercise

Abstract

Cardiovascular resistance to orthostatic load in the athletes in the 2-h recovery period after a prolonged aerobic exercise was studied. The response of the central (stroke volume and cardiac output) and peripheral blood volumes in the lower and upper extremities and abdominal and cervical regions in response to the tilt test before and during 2 h after exercise (30 min; heart rate, 156 ± 8 beats/min) was determined by the impedance method. It is found that (1) in the initial state before exercise, the blood flow distribution in favor of the cervical region in response to the tilt test was more efficient in the athletes, despite the decreased cardiac output, which was due to a large decrease in the blood flow in the lower extremities and an increased blood flow in the cervical region; (2) after exercise, the symptoms of potential orthostatic intolerance develop, such as postural hypotension, tachycardia, and reduced peripheral pulse blood volume, which were expressed in the standing position, and a reduced effectiveness of the blood flow distribution to the cervical region in the tilt test; and (3) the ability to effectively distribute the blood flow in favor of the cervical region in the athletes after exercise remained elevated, which was due to a large decrease in the blood flow in the abdominal region and in the lower extremities at the end of the recovery period.

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Correspondence to A. A. Melnikov.

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Original Russian Text © A.A. Melnikov, S.G. Popov, A.D. Vikulov, 2014, published in Fiziologiya Cheloveka, 2014, Vol. 40, No. 3, pp. 86–95.

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Melnikov, A.A., Popov, S.G. & Vikulov, A.D. Cardiovascular resistance to orthostatic load in athletes after aerobic exercise. Hum Physiol 40, 310–318 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1134/S0362119714030104

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Keywords

  • orthostasis
  • tilt test
  • exercise
  • recovery
  • athletes